Thursday Threads: Library RFP Registry, Transformed Libraries talk at IMLSfocus, DIY VPN

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

Welcome spring in the northern hemisphere! Thoughts turn to fresh new growth — a new tool to help with writing documents for procuring library systems, a fresh way to think about how libraries can transform and be transformed, and spring cleaning for your browsing habits with a do-it-yourself VPN.

Thursday Threads: Fake Social Media, Netflix is Huge, Secret TPP is Bad

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

In this week’s Thursday Threads we look at the rise of fake social media influence, how a young media company (Netflix) is now bigger than an old media company (CBS), and a reminder of how secrecy in constructing trade agreements is a bad idea.

Feel free to send this to others you think might be interested in the topics. If you find these threads interesting and useful, you might want to add the Thursday Threads RSS Feed to your feed reader or subscribe to e-mail delivery using the form to the right. If you would like a more raw and immediate version of these types of stories, watch my Pinboard bookmarks (or subscribe to its feed in your feed reader). Items posted to are also sent out as tweets; you can follow me on Twitter. Comments and tips, as always, are welcome.

Thursday Threads: Web Time Travel, Fake Engine Noise, The Tech Behind Delivering Pictures of Behinds

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

In this week’s DLTJ Thursday Threads: the introduction of a web service that points you to old copies of web pages, dispelling illusions of engine noise, and admiring the technical architecture of Amazon Web Services that gives us the power to witness Kim Kardashian’s back side.

Thursday Threads: Google Maps is Good, DRM is Bad, and Two-factor Authentication can be Ugly

Looking at maps, Eastern Carolina University Digital Collections.

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

Three threads this week: how mapping technologies have come such a long way in the past few years, and why explaining digital rights management is bad for your sanity, a cautionary tale for those trying to be more conscious about security their digital lives.

Thursday Threads: All about online privacy, or lack thereof

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

Are you paranoid yet? Are you worried that the secret you shared anonymously might come right back to you? Or wondering why advertisements seem to follow you around from web page to web page? Or just creeped out by internet-enabled services tracking your every move? Or angry that mobile carriers made it very easy for anyone to track every page you visited from your smartphone? Or maybe you will simply give up any personal information for a delicious cookie? (Are you paranoid now?)

Thursday Threads: Mobile Device Encryption, Getty Images for Free

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

Just a brief pair of threads this week. First is a look at what is happening with mobile device encryption as consumer electronics companies deal with data privacy in the post-Snowden era. There is also the predictable backlash from law enforcement organizations, and perhaps I just telegraphed how I feel on the matter. The second thread looks at how Getty Images is trying to get into distributing its content for free to get it in front of eyeballs that will end up paying for some of it.

Thursday Threads: Patron Privacy on Library Sites, Communicating with Developers, Kuali Continued

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

In the DLTJ Thursday Threads this week: an analysis of how external services included on library web pages can impact patron privacy, pointers to a series of helpful posts from OCLC on communication between software users and software developers, and lastly an update on the continuing discussion of the Kuali Foundation Board’s announcement forming a commercial entity.

Before we get started on this week’s threads, I want to point out a free online symposium that LYRASIS is performing next week on sustainable cultural heritage open source software. Details are on the FOSS4Lib site, you can register on the LYRASIS events site, and then join the open discussion on the discuss.foss4lib.org site before, during and after the symposium.

Thursday Threads: Sakai Reverberations, Ada Initiative Fundraising, Cost of Bandwidth

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

Welcome to the latest edition of Thursday Threads. This week’s post has a continuation of the commentary about the Kuali Board’s decisions from last month. Next, news of a fundraising campaign by the Ada Initiative in support of women in technology fields. Lastly, an article that looks at the relative bulk bandwidth costs around the world.

Thursday Threads: History of the Future, Kuali change-of-focus, 2018 Mindset List

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

This weeks threads are a mixture of the future, the present and the past. Starting things off is A History of the Future in 100 Objects, a revealing look at what technology and society has in store for us. Parts of this resource are available freely on the website with the rest available as a $5 e-book. Next, in the present, is the decision by the Kuali Foundation to shift to a for-profit model and what it means for open source in the academic domain. And finally, a look at the past with the mindset list for the class of 2018 from Beloit College.

Thursday Threads: Twitter Timeline Changes, Report on Future Library Technology, USB Security

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

Two weeks in a row! This week’s DLTJ Thursday Threads looks at how Twitter changed its timeline functionality to include things that it thinks you’ll find interesting. Next, for the academic libraries in the audience, is a report from the New Media Consortium on trends and technologies that will libraries will likely encounter in the next five years. Lastly, news about research into how USB devices can spread malware in ways we can’t detect.