Thursday Threads: Windows XP end-of-life, Maturing open source models, Trashcans that track you

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Three groups of stories in this long-in-coming DLTJ Thursday Threads. First, we look at the pent-up risks of running Windows XP systems given that support for that operating system is scheduled to end in April 2014. Second, a pair of articles that look at the ups and downs of open source software governance as it relates to the Apache Foundation. And lastly, look out for that garbage can — it may be watching your every move.

Thursday Threads: Google’s Social Strategy, Big Data, Patriot Act outside U.S., Frightening Copyright Revisited

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It might have been the week of the annual American Library Association meeting with all the news and announcements and programming that came from it — as well as getting into the dog days of summer — but interesting news at the intersection of technology and libraries did not take a pause. Google made a big splash this week with tantalizing tidbits about its new social media project; it is at a look-but-don’t-touch stage, but the look is enticing. Then there were two articles about really big data — what is produced in the high energy physics supercolider at CERN and what we produce as a society. And to go along with that data we produce as a society is another warning that much of it isn’t safe from the prying eyes of the USA PATRIOT Act. Finally, we revisit the Georgia State University copyright case with a comment on the potential chilling impacts on free speech.

LC’s Adoption of Silverlight — Good Deal for Microsoft, Bad Deal for the Rest of Us

Earlier this year, Microsoft announced that it was giving $3 million in “funding, software, technological expertise, training and support services” to the Library of Congress to build on-site and online exhibits of LC historical collections. Others have commented on this. From a Jester’s point of view, I’ve got problems with this on two fronts: Microsoft using LC in a cheap marketing ploy and LC’s use of a new technology that impedes access for no good technical reason.

Microsoft Giving Away Developer Software to Students

Stu Hicks, one of OhioLINK’s systems engineers, told the OhioLINK staff last night about a new program at Microsoft called DreamSpark. Through this program, post-secondary students around the world who are attending accredited schools or universities can download some of Microsoft’s big developer and designer tools free of charge. At the time and place this post is being written, the list of software is:

  • Visual Studio 2008 Professional Edition
  • Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition
  • SQL Server 2005 Developers Edition
  • Expression Studio
  • XNA Game Studio
  • Visual Studio 2005 Professional Edition
  • Visual C# 2005 Express Edition
  • Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition