Open Repositories 2011 Report: DSpace on Spring and DuraSpace

This week I am attending the Open Repositories conference in Austin, Texas, and yesterday was the second preconference day (and the first day I was in Austin). Coming in as I did I only had time to attend two preconference sessions: one on the integration — or maybe “invasion” of the Spring Framework — into DSpace and one on the introduction of the DuraCloud service and code.

Picking a Java Web Application Framework

We’re beginning a new phase of our digital library development at OhioLINK and an oversimplification of one of the consequences of this new phase is that we will be developing more software from scratch rather than adapting stuff that we find out there on the net. (Another consequence of this new phase is our interest in applying the Service-Oriented Architecture paradigm to library applications.) In previous phases, we were somewhat at the mercy of whatever development framework was used in the application we were adopting. As we start this new development where we control more of our own destiny, we wanted to take a step back and look at the available frameworks to support our development efforts. The options we identified at the start were plain Java servlets, Apache Struts, Spring Framework, and EJB3 with JBoss SEAM.

Access Management and Provisioning Technology

Building on the shoulders of others — isn’t that how that quote goes? There has been a stack of printouts on my desk for a while now for various access management and service provisioning technologies. Rather than keep the paper, I’m putting the list here so I know how to get back to them if/when I need to. (Of course, along the way if you’d like to comment on them or suggest others to look at, please feel free to do so in the comments.) Note, too, that by listing them here I’m not proposing, or even sure if, all of these pieces come together to a coherent structure.