Join the Community: Open Source is Nothing Without You

During the American Library Association meeting in Chicago in 2013 I gave an “ignite” talk on open source software in libraries. (The “ignite talk” format, if you’re not familiar, is one in which “each speaker is allocated five minutes of presentation time and is accompanied by 20 presentation slides. During presentations, each slide is displayed for 15 seconds and then automatically advanced.”1 ) The talk was geared to inspiring community involvement and commitment in open source projects. The abstract:

The open source method for developing software works best when everyone contributes a little bit to the process. Do you benefit from open source? Do you wish the open source you use was a little better? Don’t know why the community nature of open source is important? Hear what you can do to make the world a better place by nudging your favorite open source project along a path to perfection.

Local and Unique and Digital: A Evolving Trend for Libraries and Cultural Heritage Institutions

These are slides and audio from presentation given at the LOUIS Users Group meeting, on October 4, 2013, in Baton Rouge, LA. The description of the talk was:

Libraries have been digitizing materials for decades as surrogates for access to physical materials, and in doing so have broadened the range of people and uses for library materials. With projects like Hathi Trust and Google Book Search systematically digitizing mass-produced monographs and making them available within the bounds of copyright law, libraries continue the trend of digitizing what is local and unique, and the emergence of projects like the Digital Public Library of America and OCLC’s WorldCat Digital Collection Gateway expand discoverability of the local and unique well beyond the library’s traditional reach. This presentation provides an overview of this trend, updates on what libraries can do, and describes activities LYRASIS is doing to help libraries and other cultural heritage institutions expand their reach.

Host Your Own Virtual Lightning Talks Using Google Hangout — Slides and Links from ALA2013 Presentation

In the “very meta” category, this morning I gave a lightning talk about lightning talks to a crowd of about 150 at the LITA Lightning Talks session. More specifically, it was a brief presentation on how Code4Lib uses Google Hangouts-on-Air for its Virtual Lightning Talks. The slides and links from the slides are included below.

URLs from the presentation


As promised, here are the URLs from the presentation.

Notes on the Code4Lib Virtual Lightning Talks

Last week I emcee’d the second Code4Lib Virtual Lightning talk session and I wanted to record some notes and pointers here in case me (or anyone else) wants to do the same thing again. First, though, here is a list of those that presented with links to the talks archived on Internet Archive.

Name Topic
Terry Brady File Analyzer and Metadata Harvester
Misty De Meo Transitioning a legacy thesaurus to SKOS/RDF
Roy Tennant Under the Hood of Hadoop Processing at OCLC Research
Kate Kosturski How I Taught Myself Drupal In a Weekend (And You Can Too!)

Latest Views on JPEG2000 for Presentation and Archiving

Earlier this month, the JPEG 2000 Implementation Working Group, the Wellcome Trust Library, and the U.K. Digital Preservation Coalition hosted a free one-day seminar called JPEG2000 for the Practitioner. The presentation slides are now linked to the seminar program and is a short report of the event by Christy Henshaw of Wellcome Library. The presentation slides by themselves carry a great deal of depth even without a recording of the audio. In particular I can recommend “What did JPEG 2000 ever do for us?” by Simon Tanner and “JPEG 2000 standardization – a pragmatic viewpoint” by Richard Clark. As brief introductions to where we’ve been with JPEG 2000 and where we could go.

From “Moby-Dick” To “Mash-Ups:” Thinking About Bibliographic Networks at ALA Annual 2010

Ron Murray and Barbara Tillett, both from the Library of Congress, are presenting their research in thinking about bibliographic information as networks of interrelated nodes at ALA Annual. This is a continuation of their “paper tool” work which was presented at the Library of Congress last year.

“What Is Your Library Doing about Emerging Technologies?”

At the American Library Association conference this weekend, I’ll be part of a panel presentation from the LITA Emerging Technologies Interest Group with the title “What Is Your Library Doing about Emerging Technologies?” The presentation will be on Saturday, June 26 from 1:30pm to 3:30pm in room 103B of the Washington Convention Center. The publicity blurb:

A new job title of “Emerging Technology Librarian” seems to reflect an awareness among today’s libraries that there is a need for a librarians whose main role is to explore, evaluate, promote, and implement various emerging technologies. 19 librarians in different fields of librarianship at academic, school, and public libraries will discuss the topic of emerging technologies at libraries, their evaluation, implementation, adoption, and management challenges.

Presentation Announcement: Re-Imagining the Bibliographic Universe — FRBR, Physics and the World Wide Web

Next Monday (November 30, 2009) a colleague at the Library of Congress will be giving a presentation on modeling bibliographic information based on a “Paper Tool” technique adopted from physics. The title of the talk is “Re-Imagining the Bibliographic Universe: FRBR, Physics and the World Wide Web and will be presented by Ron Murray (no relation), Digital Conversion Specialist in the Preservation Reformatting Division of LC.
Note!A PDF of the presentation slides (35MB ZIP file) is now available online.

The presentation is open to the public, and will be from 10am to noon in the Mumford Room (6th floor of the LC Madison Building). The abstract of the talk is: