Free Software in Libraries, success stories and their impact on the library today

Today I was privileged to present to the 6th International Congress of Technological Innovation, Innovatics 2016, organized by Duoc UC Libraries, Library of Santiago, and University of Chile Libraries. The conference was simultaneously translated in English and Spanish. To aid the translators, I wrote out the text of my presentation for them to review. Below is the text as it was intended to be presented; I did diverge in a few places mostly based on what others said earlier in the conference.

Evolution of Open Source in Libraries

Happy to Announce that I’m Joining Index Data

Index Data posted an announcement on their blog about how I will be joining them next month. Confirmed! I'll be working on the open source library service platform that was announced by EBSCO last month, and more specifically in a role as an organizer and advocate for people participating in the project. It feels like my career has been building to this role. And it also means getting re-engaged in the OLE project; I was part of the design effort in 2008-2009 and then drifted away as professional responsibilities took me in other directions. In the executive overview of the OLE design report, we said:

Setting the Right Environment: Remote Staff, Service Provider Participants, and Big-Tent Open Source Communities

NOTE! I was asked recently to prepare a 15 minute presentation on lessons learned working with a remote team hosting open source applications. The text of that presentation is below with links added to more information. Photographs are from DPLA and Flickr, and are used under Public Domain or Creative Commons derivatives-okay licenses. Photographs link to their sources.

Case Studies on Open Source Adoption in Libraries: Koha, CoralERM, and Kuali OLE

'When the Open Source System is the Best System'
Open Source Integrated Library System in a Rural American Library
Kuali OLE at the University of Chicago Library

LYRASIS has published three open source software case studies on as part of its continuation of support and services for libraries and other cultural heritage organizations interested in learning about, evaluating, adopting, and using open source software systems.

Thursday Threads: Sakai Reverberations, Ada Initiative Fundraising, Cost of Bandwidth

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Welcome to the latest edition of Thursday Threads. This week’s post has a continuation of the commentary about the Kuali Board’s decisions from last month. Next, news of a fundraising campaign by the Ada Initiative in support of women in technology fields. Lastly, an article that looks at the relative bulk bandwidth costs around the world.

Thursday Threads: History of the Future, Kuali change-of-focus, 2018 Mindset List

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This weeks threads are a mixture of the future, the present and the past. Starting things off is A History of the Future in 100 Objects, a revealing look at what technology and society has in store for us. Parts of this resource are available freely on the website with the rest available as a $5 e-book. Next, in the present, is the decision by the Kuali Foundation to shift to a for-profit model and what it means for open source in the academic domain. And finally, a look at the past with the mindset list for the class of 2018 from Beloit College.

Call for Papers: 2nd Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE2)

This is related to the Supporting Cultural Heritage Open Source Software (SCHOSS) Symposium last month. More on that topic in June. I am serving on the program committee for the WSSSPE2 conference.

Progress in scientific research is dependent on the quality and accessibility of software at all levels and it is critical to address challenges related to the development, deployment, and maintenance of reusable software as well as education around software practices. These challenges can be technological, policy based, organizational, and educational, and are of interest to developers (the software community), users (science disciplines), and researchers studying the conduct of science (science of team science, science of organizations, science of science and innovation policy, and social science communities).

Join the Community: Open Source is Nothing Without You

During the American Library Association meeting in Chicago in 2013 I gave an “ignite” talk on open source software in libraries. (The “ignite talk” format, if you’re not familiar, is one in which “each speaker is allocated five minutes of presentation time and is accompanied by 20 presentation slides. During presentations, each slide is displayed for 15 seconds and then automatically advanced.”1 ) The talk was geared to inspiring community involvement and commitment in open source projects. The abstract:

The open source method for developing software works best when everyone contributes a little bit to the process. Do you benefit from open source? Do you wish the open source you use was a little better? Don’t know why the community nature of open source is important? Hear what you can do to make the world a better place by nudging your favorite open source project along a path to perfection.

Implemented Open Source in your Library? Get Paid to Write a Case Study

Share your story of implementing an open source system at your library. If selected, you will get paid to develop a case study of your open source system adoption experience and learning.

LYRASIS, in partnership with the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is seeking academic and public libraries to share their experiences with open source systems, such as content repositories or institutional repositories, integrated library systems, or public-facing websites. The two selected case studies will be available on This effort, part of the larger LYRASIS Digital initiative, is a continuation of LYRASIS working with libraries and other cultural heritage organizations to learn about, evaluate, adopt, and use open source software systems.

Vote for an ALA2013 Ignite Session on Open Source Communities

I’ve put in a proposal on the importance of communities in open source software for an “ignite” session at the ALA Annual meeting in Chicago, and I’d appreciate your vote to get the talk into the program. If you have experienced the power and benefit of open source software, you know that the community is just as important as the code. In a 5-minute presentation accompanied by 20 slides that advance automatically every 15 seconds, I’ll be describing the many ways libraries can be a part of an open source community. Here is the brief description of the talk: