Services in a Service Oriented Architecture

This post is the second in a series about the application of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) system design pattern to library services. The first post in this series focused on defining “Service Oriented Architecture” using the analogy of a transportation network. This post goes into some detail about what makes a “service” in this architecture and offers an example using a hypothetical use case: a union library catalog (Open WorldCat) making a statement about the availability of a book.

Defining “Service Oriented Architecture” by Analogy

This post is the first in a series over the next few days that in total will attempt to lay the groundwork for a discussion of applying the Service Oriented Architecture (or SOA) software design pattern to systems and solutions in the library space. It starts with comparing the SOA concept with a multi-modal transportation network. Subsequent posts will outline use cases and describe how SOA can be applied to libraries.

Ohio Digital Commons for Education Conference Announcement

[Image: ODCE Logo]Where can faculty, administrators, librarians and technology gurus all meet to discuss learning, libraries, technology and the convergence of these activities? At the Ohio Digital Commons for Education 2007 – The Convergence of Learning, Libraries and Technology Conference, of course!

Be a part of ODCE 2007! The Ohio Digital Commons for Education partners — Ohio Learning Network, OhioLINK, and the Ohio Supercomputer Center/OARnet — are seeking interactive and engaging proposals for presentations, pre-conference workshops and technology demonstrations. Proposals are sought for the following topics:

  • E Squared – Effectiveness and Efficiencies
  • STEM2: Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine

A Known Citation Discovery Tool in a Library2.0 World

When it comes to seeking a full-text copy of that known-item citation, are our users asking “what have you done for me lately?” OpenURL has taken us pretty far when one starts in an online environment — a link that sends the citation elements to our favorite link resolver — but it only works when the user starts online with an OpenURL-enabled database. (We also need to set aside for the moment the need for some sort of OpenURL base resolver URL discovery tool — how does an arbitrary service know which OpenURL base resolver I want to use!) What if a user has a citation on a printed paper or from some other non-online form? Could we make their lives easier, too? Here is one way. (Thanks go out to Celeste Feather and Thomas Dowling for helping me think through the possibilities and issues.)

Just In Time Acquisitions versus Just In Case Acquisitions

What of a service existed where the patrons selected an item they needed out of our library catalog and that item was delivered to the patron even when the library did not yet own the item? Would that be useful? With the growth of online bookstores, our users do have the expectation of finding something they need on the web, clicking a few buttons and having it delivered. When such expectations of what is possible exist, where is the first place a patron would go to find recently published items — the online bookstore or their local library catalog? Does your gut tell you it is the online bookstore? Would it be desirable if the patron’s instinct were to be the local library catalog?

Appreciating our Heritage while Embracing a Future

Tom Wilson, LITA past president and all-around insightful LITA Top Technology Trendster, posted a commentary to the “Where have all the programmers gone?” post that deserves top billing 1. Please read and digest it before coming back here. And it’s not late to the party at all, Tom — I believe it is only now just getting interesting.

It’s All About User Services: A Summary and Commentary on the LITA Top Technology Trends meeting

What follows is a summary and commentary on the LITA Top Technology Trends meeting at ALA annual conference in New Orleans on 25-Jun-2006. What I’ve tried to do is collate comments from the panel members and add my own commentary (marked off as such from the rest of the summary) where I thought I had something useful to add. It is my hope that this summary is a faithful representation of the statements made by the participants in the panel. If not, please let me know privately or in the comment area here and I will make the appropriate corrections on the body of the blog post.

Minutes of the FEDORA Workflow Working Group meeting of 18-Jun-2006

Please note — this is a copy of the FEDORA Workflow Working Group minutes from the FEDORA Wiki. It is being posted here in order to get it into the blogosphere at the right places. Please make comments on the FEDORA Wiki “talk” page rather than on this posting.

FEDORA Workflow Working Group Meeting

18-Jun-2006, University of Virginia

Attending: Grace Agnew, Rutgers U.; Chris Awre, U. of Hull; Dan Davis, Harris Corp.; Richard Green, U. of Hull; Peter Murray, OhioLINK; Matthias Razum, FIZ Karlsruhe; Bill Parod, Northwestern U; Adam Soroka, U. of Virginia; Thorny Staples, U. of Virginia; Ross Wayland, U. of Virginia

Disruption in Publishing

Last week’s Chronicle of Higher Education Review had an opinion piece by Kate Wittenberg, director of EPIC (Electronic Publishing Initiative at Columbia) with the title “Beyond Google: What Next for Publishing?” (subscription required). An excerpt from the beginning:

While we have been busy attending conferences, workshops, and seminars on every possible aspect of scholarly communication, information technology, digital libraries, and e-publishing, students have been quietly revolutionizing the discovery and use of information. Their behavior, undertaken without consultation or attendance at formal academic events, urgently forces those of us in scholarly publishing to confront some fundamental questions about our organizations, jobs, and assumptions about our work.