JPEG2000 Summit at Library of Congress, May 12-13, 2011

It has been years since I’ve done meaningful work with JPEG2000, but I still try to keep tabs on what is happening in that community. In that vein, Rob Buckley — formerly of Xerox Research and now on his own with a consulting business — pointed me to an announcement about a JPEG2000 Summit happening at the Library of Congress next month.

Thursday Threads: Amazon Pressures Publishers, Academic Spam, Mechanical Turk Spam, Multispectral Imaging

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With the close of the year approaching, this issue marks the 14th week of DLTJ Thursday Threads. This issue has a publisher’s view of Amazon’s strong-arm tactics in book pricing, research into the possibility that academic authors could game Google Scholar with spam, demonstrations of how Amazon’s Mechanical Turk drives down the cost of enlisting humans to overwhelm anti-spam systems, and a story of multispectral imaging adding information in the process of digital preservation.

As the new year approaches, I wish you the best professionally and personally.

Books After Amazon

Latest Views on JPEG2000 for Presentation and Archiving

Earlier this month, the JPEG 2000 Implementation Working Group, the Wellcome Trust Library, and the U.K. Digital Preservation Coalition hosted a free one-day seminar called JPEG2000 for the Practitioner. The presentation slides are now linked to the seminar program and is a short report of the event by Christy Henshaw of Wellcome Library. The presentation slides by themselves carry a great deal of depth even without a recording of the audio. In particular I can recommend “What did JPEG 2000 ever do for us?” by Simon Tanner and “JPEG 2000 standardization – a pragmatic viewpoint” by Richard Clark. As brief introductions to where we’ve been with JPEG 2000 and where we could go.

Thursday Threads: Technical Debt, QR Codes in National Parks, WebP Image Format, and SSL Cautions

Week #2 of this new project to highlight interesting tidbits from the previous seven days. Well, things that were interesting to me that I hope will be interesting to DLTJ readers. Time will tell.

Thursday Threads: Print-on-Demand, Video Changing the World, Puzzling Out Public Domain, and more

I’m starting something new on DLTJ: Thursday Threads — summaries and pointers of stories, services, and other stuff that I found interesting in the previous seven days. This is culled from entries that I post to my FriendFeed lifestream through various channels (Google Reader shared items, citations shared in Zotero, Twitter posts, etc.), but since I know not everyone is using those services, it might be useful to post the best-of-the-selected here once a week. Why Thursday? Somewhere long ago I read that Thursday at 11am is the best time to put a post on a blog because Thursday lunch through Friday are the most active time for readers. I have no idea whether that is true or not, but lacking any evidence to the contrary, Thursday morning will do fine. (Obviously I’m a little late on this first one, but I’ll try to do better next time. Or not — maybe this will be a one-off weekly thing.)

Broadcast JPEG2000 Alliance Announced

Today at IBC2009 Fast Forward Video (FFV) announced the launch of the JPEG2000 Alliance, “a consortium of broadcast industry leaders dedicated to ensuring that JPEG2000 continues to develop into a leading compression standard.” According to the press release:

In addition to developing their own JPEG2000 technologies and products, these companies will collaborate to ensure widespread acceptance, deployment, and support of the compression standard for the benefit of the media and video industries. Activities will be centered on educating and creating awareness about the benefits of JPEG2000, promoting interoperability between standards and system devices, and promoting the development of tools by members and industry peers.

Use of JPEG2000 for Broadcast Video Transmission

Although my day-to-day work takes me farther away from working with digital collections in general and JPEG2000 specifically, I still have a Google News search set up looking for hits on JPEG2000 topics. An entry appeared yesterday that gives some interesting insight into how motion JPEG2000 is being used in broadcast video transmission: “HBO Opens T-VIPS Video Gateways: Norweigan Vendor Helps Premium Net Ship Content Coast to Coast

LANL Releases Open Source JPEG2000 Image Server

The lead article in the September/October issue of D-Lib Magazine release yesterday is on djatoka, the open source JPEG2000 Image Server from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The authors, Ryan Chute and Herbert Van de Sompel describe their effort in the article abstract:

Survey Responses Sought: JPEG2000 for Still Images

David Lowe, Preservation Librarian at the University of Connecticut, is coordinating a survey of JPEG2000 use for digital imagery. The survey asks questions about the use of the JPEG2000 file format (for archival purposes or for access systems), tools used (both JPEG2000 toolkits and software that embeds JPEG2000 toolkits), and considerations of mathematically lossless versus visually lossless compression settings.

This is his announcement:

I am writing to solicit your help with a survey of library-related digital project staff regarding the implementation of the JPEG 2000 standard for digital images (specifically still images and not motion). We estimate that this task will take approximately 15 minutes of your time. It is available now at: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=WXFAJwyRNZZilRWzrnum_2fw_3d_3d

Archiving in Practice with JPEG2000: ALA Annual Conference, June 29, 8am-10am

The JPEG2000 in Archives and Libraries Interest Group of the LITA division of ALA is pleased to present a program on Archiving in Practice with JPEG2000 on Sunday, June 29th from 8am to 10am in Ballroom E, Anaheim Convention Center.

The lead presentation will be given by Justin Dávila, Digital Media Workflow, Business and Technology consultant. The formal presentation will be followed an invitation to the audience to present five-minute lightning talks on the topic of JPEG2000 for cultural heritage archiving and access. More details can be found in the announcement on the j2kArcLib.info website.