Thursday Threads: Battles over strong encryption, IPv4 addresses exhausted while IPv6 surges

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Two articles in each of two threads this week:

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IPv4 Address Space Disappearing, Here Comes IPv6

Last week in DLTJ Thursday Threads I posted an entry about running out of IP addresses. Since I posted that, I’ve run across a couple of other stories and websites that bring a little more context to the consequences of last week’s distribution of the last blocks of IP addresses from the world-wide pool of available addresses. The short version: channel any panic you might be feeling into making sure your systems are ready to communicate using both the existing network standard (IPv4) and the new network standard (IPv6).

The Imagined Frequently Asked Questions

Thursday Threads: So-called “Internet Kill-switch”, IP address exhaustion, demographics of P2P piracy

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This week of DLTJ Thursday Threads covers a wide range of topics. First, from a public policy perspective, is news that the U.S. Senate has a bill proposing the study of an internet “kill-switch” that some are speculating could behave like what happened in Egypt last week. Next, from a technical perspective, is the fact that we’re running out of IP addresses, which is going to make some engineers’ lives pretty messy before it is ultimately fixed. Lastly, from a research perspective, is a paper that characterizes the demographics of users using peer-to-peer for piracy.