Call for Presentations, Workshops and Demonstrations of Innovation — Ohio LLT Conference — March 1-3, 2009

University System of Ohio

Learning, Libraries and Technology Conference
Pre-conference Workshops: March 1, 2009
Main Conference: March 2-3, 2009
Easton Town Center in Columbus, Ohio

The University System of Ohio invites you to submit proposals for the Learning, Libraries and Technology Conference, March 1-3, 2009. The conference features both submitted and invited presentations, technology demonstrations, pre-conference workshops and plenary presentations. Proposals for presentations in a number of content areas are sought and described below. In addition to the specific topics listed under each broad category, we strongly encourage proposals that represent effective use of educational technology, teaching and learning paradigms, efficient organization and dissemination of information, and innovations in education. This year, we are especially encouraging topics that deal with the intersection and interaction of higher education and the K-12 education community. Deadline to submit a proposal is October 15, 2008.

Final Version of the Higher Education Reauthorization Act Leaves Textbook Provisions Intact

Earlier this week U.S. Senate passed its own version of the “College Opportunity and Affordability Act of 2007″ (H.R.4137 to amend and extend the Higher Education Act of 1965, and for other purposes) by unanimous consent (hence no recorded vote) and appointed members of a conference committee to resolve differences with the U.S. House version. The conference committee report was published yesterday1. This afternoon the House completed a roll-call vote approving the conference version. If I remember my civics class correctly, the bill now goes to the president for a signature. The conference report had to be approved by the Senate, which it did late Thursday night. Although the White House previously opposed the bill, the Associate Press reports that President Bush is expected to sign the bill.

Colorado Community College System Announces Flat-price Electronic Textbooks from Pearson Education

Colorado Community College System (CCCS) signed an agreement with Pearson Education for flat-rate access to Pearson textbook content online. News of this comes by way of a link left by Lorcan Dempsey in a comment to an earlier DLTJ entry that pointed to a blog entry by Michael Cairns talking about yesterday’s Wall Street Journal article about custom textbooks, which in turn pointed to a blog posting by Alison Pendergast excerpting a Chronicle of Higher Education Wired Campus story about this agreement. (Whew! It was a long trail, but well worth it!) Key points in the agreement:

The Complex World of the Textbook

Who knew the college textbook marketplace could be so complex? The agents in this ecosystem and their interests are so intertwined that as a whole it poses a massive amount of inertia for those who attempt to change the marketplace. I’ve been involved for about a year with an effort to change the textbook ecosystem for Ohio college students, and I am amazed at the complexity with each new layer of the onion that is peeled back. I thought it worthwhile to document my findings here and ask what insights others have.

Selling Placement in Library Search Results

This morning’s Chronicle of Higher Education Wired Campus blog has a story with the title “Should Colleges Sell Ads to Pay for New Technology?” that links to a blog posting by Martin Weller of the Open University in the U.K. As it happens, a colleague and I were talking about a strikingly similar topic at lunch yesterday: not just that advertisements could pay for new technology but that ads could pay for content in the libraries. I felt strangely uncomfortable with the concept, and I still do, so (in jester fashion) what better way to explore the discomfort than in a posting here on DLTJ.

Discussions of Textbooks Hit the Mainstream Media

There has been an increasing focus on the cost of textbooks in the mainstream media this year, and I don’t think it is the case that I’m just becoming more sensitized to it. Take for example the editorial from the Washington Post on February 7th. The second paragraph succinctly describes the issues being debated most often:

There are several reasons that textbooks are so costly. For one, even though there have been no major advances in fields such as calculus and elementary physics in decades or even centuries, publishers still churn out new editions of textbooks on these subjects every three or four years. The changes are typically superficial, but they prevent students from being able to purchase used, older editions. Publishers also frequently bundle unwanted additional materials such as CD-ROMs and study guides with textbooks. Professors rarely assign these extra materials, which drive up costs, and students often cannot sell the books back to bookstores once the shrink-wrap has been removed. Publishers can get away with these shenanigans because there’s a fundamental disconnect in the textbook marketplace: The people paying for the books (the students) are not the ones choosing them (the teachers).

OhioLINK seeks applicants for two positions: User Services Development and Electronic Licensing

Applications are invited for two positions at OhioLINK: an Assistant Director of Library Systems — User Services Development and an Assistant Director of Electronic Licensing. OhioLINK is a consortium of Ohio’s college and university libraries and the State Library of Ohio. It serves more than 600,000 students, faculty, staff, and other researchers at 87 institutions. OhioLINK provides a multitude of services including over 100 databases consisting of bibliographic, electronic journals, electronic books, images, videos, and audio files. For more information about OhioLINK, see http://www.ohiolink.edu/

Assistant Director of Library Systems — User Services Development

“Teaching with Digital Texts” presentation

At the Ohio Digital Commons for Education conference yesterday I had the privilege of chairing a panel for a session called “Teaching with Digital Texts: Comparative Experiences from the Field“. The panel was a mixture of the principle investigators and the publisher representatives from two pilot projects that ran last fall testing the economics and suitability of enhanced digital learning materials. The abstract of the session and the participants were:

Microsoft Giving Away Developer Software to Students

Stu Hicks, one of OhioLINK’s systems engineers, told the OhioLINK staff last night about a new program at Microsoft called DreamSpark. Through this program, post-secondary students around the world who are attending accredited schools or universities can download some of Microsoft’s big developer and designer tools free of charge. At the time and place this post is being written, the list of software is:

  • Visual Studio 2008 Professional Edition
  • Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition
  • SQL Server 2005 Developers Edition
  • Expression Studio
  • XNA Game Studio
  • Visual Studio 2005 Professional Edition
  • Visual C# 2005 Express Edition
  • Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition

Textbook Disclosure Rules in U.S. House Bill

The Chronicle of Higher Education had an article today [subscription required] about legislation pending on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives that in part includes rules for disclosure of textbook selection and pricing. The lever is the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, a major law that governs federal student aid. (In other words, it is unlikely that, if passed, an institution would not follow these proposed rules because it would mean not getting federal financial aid money for their students. Nice lever, eh?) The House of Representatives is expected to vote on the “College Opportunity and Affordability Act,” the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, on Thursday, February 7th.