Proposals Now Being Accepted for the Ohio Educational Technology Conference, February 2010

The theme of the 2010 Ohio Educational Technology Conference, P-20 Conversations: Shaping a Path for the 21st Century Student, addresses the need to provide seamless technology integration throughout students’ careers. Reflecting this year’s theme, the sponsors of last year’s Learning, Libraries and Technology conference — Ohio Learning Network (OLN), OhioLINK and OARnet — have joined with the Ohio Resource Center (ORC) and eTech Ohio, the technology service provider for primary and secondary education, to provide a premiere professional development event for all of us – teachers, faculty, librarians, instructional designers, administrators, students, and technicians.

A Thread of Comments on the OLE Project Draft Report

Carl Grant, president of Ex Libris North America, posted a pair of messages on his corporate blog that it is worth calling attention to regarding the OLE Project final report, if you haven’t already run into them: OLE; The unanswered questions and Library Software Solutions – We need a higher level of discourse... Equally important is the comment on the first by Brad Wheeler, Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer at Indiana University. The whole thread should take about five minutes to read; five minutes well spent if you are interested in the intersection of community source software development with proprietary, closed-source software development. It is even more important if you are looking for a case study of governance issues surrounding community source software development. Go ahead…I’ll wait.

Federal Textbook Disclosure Rules Now Law

The fact that the Higher Education Opportunity Act (Public Law 110-315) — otherwise known as HEOA — was signed into law last year is probably not big news to anyone. One of the parts of the bill that I have been following and commented on here in DLTJ is the textbook disclosure rules. I haven’t posted follow-up commentary here because I’ve been expecting that the U.S. Department of Education will be forthcoming with new regulations regarding the implementation of the disclosure rules. As it turns out, a sentence was added into the legislation between the time I last read it closely and when it finally was made law: “No Regulatory Authority- The Secretary shall not promulgate regulations with respect to this section.” It would appear the language of the law stands on its own.

Textbook Affordability at the Student Success Assessment Summit

I had the pleasure of presenting on a panel at the Ohio Student Success Assessment Summit this morning on the topic of textbooks and open educational resources. Specifically, I was talking about the plans and desires of the University System of Ohio to help faculty help students with the escalating of costs of learning materials. My talk (below and on SlideShare) gives a background of the problem in the context of the State of Ohio, principles upon which a working plan for statewide support is forming, and strategic themes

Flat World Knowledge and U.S. Gov’t on Open Access Course Materials

The sand is really starting to shift under the traditional textbook providers as the open course content movement shows signs of, well, movement. Already this year there are two events that point to shifts in how instructors and students can shortcut the complex ecosystem of textbooks as we know it today. First, Flat World Knowledge — a provider of open access course materials — launched earlier this year. Second, new legislation has been proposed in the U.S. Congress to mandate that some agencies use their funding to produce open access course materials.

Flat World Knowledge Launches

Online Editions of Out-of-Print Books Result from Library/Press Partnership at Univ of Pittsburgh

Late last month, the University of Pittsburgh Press and Library System announced a joint effort to revive 500 titles with online and print-on demand access. I originally found this via a post on the Course materials, Innovation, and Technology in Education (CITE) blog. Since we have been ramping up discussions here in Ohio about ways OhioLINK can be an aggregation point for efforts at the four university press services in Ohio, I was interested to read about this and learn more.

Dr. Michael Wesch to Give Keynote at LLT 2009

Dr. Michael Wesch, a cultural anthropologist dubbed “the explainer” by Wired magazine, will give the keynote address “Mediated Culture: Tales from New Guinea, New Media and New Experiments in Learning” on Monday, March 2, at the University System of Ohio’s Learning, Libraries & Technology Conference 2009.

Using examples from fieldwork in Papua New Guinea, YouTube and “the future,” this presentation will demonstrate the profound ways in which media are pervasive in our lives, mediating our relationships in ways we often do not recognize. Dr. Wesch will showcase and discuss his own attempts to leverage new media to create new forms of community and conversation to enhance learning and create a rich virtual learning environment. Visit the conference web site for more information about Dr. Wesch, Assistant Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Digital Ethnography at Kansas State University, and his presentation.

Program Posted, Registration Open for Learning, Libraries and Technology Conference

Pre-conference workshop descriptions [PDF] and the preliminary program [PDF] as well as the registration form for the Learning, Libraries and Technology Conference have been posted to the conference website. Learning, Libraries & Technology 2009 is a learning and networking opportunity from the University System of Ohio with content of interest to everyone involved in Ohio education, including those from colleges and universities of all sizes, independent colleges, workforce development centers and high schools. Held at the Easton Town Center in Columbus, Ohio, the pre-conference Workshops will be on March 1, 2009 followed by the main conference on March 2-3, 2009.

Learning, Libraries & Technology 2009 Conference will be the tenth anniversary of Ohio’s premier higher education conference, previously known as the Ohio Digital Commons for Education Conference. Although the name might have changed, this year’s conference will deliver all the same great professional development and networking opportunities from past conferences, including keynote sessions, vendor exhibits and technology demonstrations. In order to attract as many people as possible to attend this special 10th anniversary conference, organizers are reducing conference fees to just $195 ($95 for students) for two-day registrations, and $95 ($55 for students) for one-day registrations.

Google Book Search Settlement: Public Access Service

One of the very relevant aspects of the Google Book Search Settlement Agreement to libraries is the provision that allows for free public access to the full text of books in public and academic libraries. The Notice of Settlement summary says: “Google will provide, on request, ‘Public Access’ licenses for free through a dedicated computer terminal at each public library building and through an agreed number of dedicated computer terminals at non-profit higher educational institutions located in the United States.” (Notice; Q9(F)(1)(c); p. 18) The details beyond the summary are quite a bit more interesting and, of course, have tidbits of useful information that isn’t in the summary.

Call for Presentations, Workshops and Demonstrations of Innovation — Ohio LLT Conference — March 1-3, 2009

University System of Ohio

Learning, Libraries and Technology Conference
Pre-conference Workshops: March 1, 2009
Main Conference: March 2-3, 2009
Easton Town Center in Columbus, Ohio

The University System of Ohio invites you to submit proposals for the Learning, Libraries and Technology Conference, March 1-3, 2009. The conference features both submitted and invited presentations, technology demonstrations, pre-conference workshops and plenary presentations. Proposals for presentations in a number of content areas are sought and described below. In addition to the specific topics listed under each broad category, we strongly encourage proposals that represent effective use of educational technology, teaching and learning paradigms, efficient organization and dissemination of information, and innovations in education. This year, we are especially encouraging topics that deal with the intersection and interaction of higher education and the K-12 education community. Deadline to submit a proposal is October 15, 2008.