Collector of Code4Lib Conference Tweets Now Turned On

As I did last year, I’ve set up Martin Hawksey’s Twitter Archiving Google Spreadsheet (TAGS) to cover this year’s Code4Lib conference twitter hashtag. This is a really neat tool that comes with its own dashboard, links to various visualizations, and access to the complete archive so you can make up your own derivatives.

The collection script runs every five minutes (I’ll dial that back to once a day after the conference is over).

Added note! After I posted an announcement of this twitter archive to the Code4Lib mailing list, Eric Morgan sent a link to his 2011 analysis of backchannel chatter.

Host Your Own Virtual Lightning Talks Using Google Hangout — Slides and Links from ALA2013 Presentation

In the “very meta” category, this morning I gave a lightning talk about lightning talks to a crowd of about 150 at the LITA Lightning Talks session. More specifically, it was a brief presentation on how Code4Lib uses Google Hangouts-on-Air for its Virtual Lightning Talks. The slides and links from the slides are included below.

URLs from the presentation


As promised, here are the URLs from the presentation.

Code4Lib Journal Issue #20 Published; My Editorial: “It is Volunteers All the Way Down…”

Issue #20 of the Code4Lib Journal was just published, and I had the honor of being the coordinating editor for the issue. Being on the editorial committee of the Journal has been a heck of an experience, and I think I’ve had just a taste of what journal editors and publishers must go through to produce quality content.

My editorial focused on an issue that has banged around in my head for a while and has come up in multiple venues in recent years — how do we grow as a community while remaining responsive to the community and true to its roots. I suggest that there is a merit-based way to approach this, and I lay out my thoughts in that article.

Notes on the Code4Lib Virtual Lightning Talks

Last week I emcee’d the second Code4Lib Virtual Lightning talk session and I wanted to record some notes and pointers here in case me (or anyone else) wants to do the same thing again. First, though, here is a list of those that presented with links to the talks archived on Internet Archive.

Name Topic
Terry Brady File Analyzer and Metadata Harvester
Misty De Meo Transitioning a legacy thesaurus to SKOS/RDF
Roy Tennant Under the Hood of Hadoop Processing at OCLC Research
Kate Kosturski How I Taught Myself Drupal In a Weekend (And You Can Too!)

Trip Report of DPLA Audience & Participation Workstream

On December 6, 2012, the Audience and Participation workstream met at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. About two dozen colleagues participated in person and remotely via Google+ Hangout to talk about processes and strategies for getting content into the DPLA (the content hubs and service hubs strategy), brainstormed on the types of users and the types of uses for the DPLA, and outlined marketing and branding messages that aligned with the goals and technology of the DPLA while getting content contributors and application developers excited about what the DPLA represents. I’m happy to have been invited to take part in the meeting, am grateful to DPLA for funding my travel to attend in person, and came away excited and energized about the DPLA plans — if also with a few commitments to help move the project along.

Thursday Threads: Developer Genders, Facebook Release Engineering, Alcohol Among Technologists

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You’ll get the sense that this week’s Thursday Threads is stacked towards cultural awareness. First is the view of a developer of the female gender in a room of peers at a meeting of the Digital Public Library of America. The second thread is a pointer to a story about Facebook’s software release process, and it leads into a story about the role of alcohol in technology conferences and reflections from the library technology community.

Recordings from Code4Lib Virtual Lightning Talks Available

Thanks to everyone for participating in the first Code4Lib Virtual Lightning Talks on Friday. In particular, my gratitude goes out to Ed Corrado, Luciano Ramalho, Michael Appleby, and Jay Luker being the first presenters to try this scheme for connecting library technologists. My apologies also to those who couldn’t connect, in particular to Elias Tzoc Caniz who had signed up but found himself locked out by a simultaneous user count in the presentation system. Recordings of the presentation audio and screen capture video are now up in the Internet Archive.

Name Topic
Edward M. Corrado CodaBox: Using E-Prints for a small scale personal repository

Code4Lib Virtual Lightning Talks — First round, April 4th 2011

One of the highlights of the Code4Lib annual meeting is the “lightning talk” rounds. A lightning talk is a fast-paced 5 minute talk on a topic of the presenter’s choosing. They are usually scheduled on an ad-hoc, first-come-first-served basis on the day of the event. They are an opportunity to provide a platform for someone who is just getting started with public speaking, who wants to ask a question or invite people to help with a project, or for someone to boast about something he or she did or tell a short cautionary story. These things are all interesting and worth talking about, but there might not be enough to say about them to fill up a full session timeslot.

A Successful BarCampOhio/LibraryCampOhio

I’m pleased to be able to report a successful running of a BarCamp here earlier this week. Billed as BarCampOhio/LibraryCampOhio — a mixture of .com and library technologists — we had a good turnout and a lively discussion on a variety of topics. Thanks and gratitude go out to OCLC for offering the space free-of-charge and to T-Mobile for sponsoring the event lunch.

We had about 35 people for the event, including out-of-state’rs from Pennsylvania and Maryland. Being a BarCamp, some of the most valuable conversations were the ones that weren’t organized, but among the organized topics the participants talked about Drupal, social media / marketing / community building, hardware and software management, virtualization and cloud computing, and SOLR.

Registration Open for BarCampOhio/LibraryCampOhio (August 11, 2008)

Registration is open for the BarCampOhio/LibraryCampOhio meeting on Monday, August 11th from 10am to 5:30pm at the OCLC Conference Center in Dublin, OH. Other details are on the event homepage.

What is a BarCamp?1


First and foremost: This is NOT a conference. Do not expect to be talked at by an ‘expert’ behind a podium. This is an event similar to getting together with some friends at a bar to talk. That’s the “bar” part of BarCamp. The “camp” part is a little much for us to pull off so if you do read the BarCamp page, keep in mind that you do NOT need to bring a sleeping bag.