Google Book Search Settlement: Public Access Service

One of the very relevant aspects of the Google Book Search Settlement Agreement to libraries is the provision that allows for free public access to the full text of books in public and academic libraries. The Notice of Settlement summary says: “Google will provide, on request, ‘Public Access’ licenses for free through a dedicated computer terminal at each public library building and through an agreed number of dedicated computer terminals at non-profit higher educational institutions located in the United States.” (Notice; Q9(F)(1)(c); p. 18) The details beyond the summary are quite a bit more interesting and, of course, have tidbits of useful information that isn’t in the summary.

Soundprint’s ‘Who Needs Libraries?’

OhioLINK’s Meg Spernoga pointed our staff to a 30 minute audio documentary called Who Needs Libraries? from Soundprint.org:

As more and more information is available on-line, as Amazon rolls out new software that allows anyone to find any passage in any book, an important question becomes: Who needs libraries anymore? Why does anyone need four walls filled with paper between covers? Surprisingly, they still do and in this program Producer Richard Paul explores why; looking at how university libraries, school libraries and public libraries have adapted to the new information world. This program airs as part of our ongoing series on education and technology, and is funded in part by the U.S. Department of Education.

Analysis of CDL’s XTF textIndexer to Replace the Local Files with FEDORA Objects

This is a continuation of the investigation about integrating the California Digital Library’s XTF software into the FEDORA digital object repository that started earlier. This analysis looks at the textIndexer module in particular, starting with an overview of how textIndexer works now with filesystem-based objects and ending with an outline of how this could with reading objects from a FEDORA repository instead.

XTF’s Native File System handler

Natively, XTF wants to read content out of the file system. The core of the processing is done in these two class files:

TextIndexer.java

CDL’s XTF as a Front End to Fedora

We’re experimenting pretty heavily now with the California Digital Library‘s XTF framework as a front-end to a FEDORA object repository. Initial efforts look promising — thanks go out to Brian Tingle and Kirk Hastings of CDL; Jeff Cousens, Steve DiDomenico, and Bill Parod from Northwestern; and Ross Wayland from UVa for helping us along in the right direction.

XTF into Eclipse How-To


As we get more serious about XTF, I wrote up a How-To document for bringing XTF into Eclipse so that it can be deployed as a dynamic web application. Let me know if you find it useful. Definitely let me know if you find it in error. We haven’t put a version of XTF into OhioLINK’s source code repository, but that might follow shortly.