Welcome to the Disruptive Library Technology Jester. From here you can browse the musings and visions of a library technologist as he walks the fine line between the best of the library profession on one side and the best of technology on the other.

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Recent Posts

Interesting Shibboleth Use Case: Enforcing Geographic Restrictions

Last month’s HathiTrust newsletter had an interesting technical tidbit at the top about access to out-of-print and brittle or missing items:

One of the lawful uses of in-copyright works HathiTrust has been pursuing is to provide access on an institutional basis to works that fall under United States Copyright Law Section 108 conditions: works in HathiTrust that are not available on the market at a fair price, and for which print copies owned by HathiTrust member institutions are damaged, deteriorating, lost or stolen. As a part of becoming a member, institutions are required to submit information about their print holdings for fee calculation purposes. We have also been requesting information about the holdings status and condition of works, to facilitate uses of works where permissible by law (specifications for HathiTrust holdings data are available at http://www.hathitrust.org/print_holdings).

Trip Report of DPLA Audience & Participation Workstream

On December 6, 2012, the Audience and Participation workstream met at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. About two dozen colleagues participated in person and remotely via Google+ Hangout to talk about processes and strategies for getting content into the DPLA (the content hubs and service hubs strategy), brainstormed on the types of users and the types of uses for the DPLA, and outlined marketing and branding messages that aligned with the goals and technology of the DPLA while getting content contributors and application developers excited about what the DPLA represents. I’m happy to have been invited to take part in the meeting, am grateful to DPLA for funding my travel to attend in person, and came away excited and energized about the DPLA plans — if also with a few commitments to help move the project along.

Trip Report of DPLA Chattanooga Appfest: Project Shows Signs of Life

Below is my report of the DPLA AppFest last month. This post is the raw input of an article on the IMLS blog that was co-written with Mary Barnett, Social Media Coordinator at the Chattanooga Public Library. I also attended yesterday’s DPLA Audience and Participation workstream meeting at George Mason University, and hope to have a similar trip report posted soon.

The Digital Public Library of America held an AppFest gathering at the Chattanooga Public Library on November 8-9, 2012 for a full day of designing, developing and discussion. About 40 people attended from a wide range of backgrounds: