Welcome to the Disruptive Library Technology Jester. From here you can browse the musings and visions of a library technologist as he walks the fine line between the best of the library profession on one side and the best of technology on the other.

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Recent Posts

The Hourglass of a National E-Book Program

This weekend I was at the second “DPLAfest” for the Digital Public Library of America. For a while I was in the national e-book program track. Participants from public and academic libraries, from consortia, from publishers, and from authors discussed what a national ebok program for libraries would look like. There were discussions of the multiple paths through which content could get into libraries: front-list titles, mid- and back-list titles, public domain works, independent publishers, and individual authors. And there was also discussion about many ways the ebooks could appear in libraries: in Adobe Digital Edition catalogs, through e-reader applications, in public access catalogs, and so forth. In between the sources and the destinations was the “marketplace” concept. And that reminded me of a similar architecture — the internet “hourglass”.

Open Access Attitudes of Computer Science Professors

My Communications of the ACM came in the main recently, and in an article about the future of scholarly publishing in computer science (in general — and what the ACM Publications Board is thinking about doing), there was this paragraph about the attitudes of a subset of ACM members towards open access publishing.

What Does it Mean to Have Unlimited Storage in the Cloud?

We’ve seen big announcements recently about unlimited cloud storage offerings for a flat monthly or fee. Dropbox offers it for subscribers to its Business plan. Similarly, Google has unlimited storage for Google Apps for Business customers. In both cases, though, you have to be part of a business group of some sort. Then Microsoft unlimited storage for any subscriber of all Office 365 customers (Home, School, and soon Business) as bundled offering of OneDrive with the Office suite of products. Now comes word today from Amazon of unlimited storage to consumers…no need to be part of a business grouping or have bundled software come with it.

Thursday Threads: Web Time Travel, Fake Engine Noise, The Tech Behind Delivering Pictures of Behinds

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In this week’s DLTJ Thursday Threads: the introduction of a web service that points you to old copies of web pages, dispelling illusions of engine noise, and admiring the technical architecture of Amazon Web Services that gives us the power to witness Kim Kardashian’s back side.