Welcome to the Disruptive Library Technology Jester. From here you can browse the musings and visions of a library technologist as he walks the fine line between the best of the library profession on one side and the best of technology on the other.

You can navigate through DLTJ several ways. Your first stop might be the introductory material about this blog and the jester himself under the "about" heading to the left. Another way would be to pick a facet below to browse: "by cagetory" for a rough categorization of postings, "by tags" for a finer granularity of topics, or "by date" for a chronological view. Third, use the search box in the left column as a keyword approach to content in DLTJ. And last, recent postings by the Jester can be found below the faceted list.

I hope you enjoy your visit. Please feel free to leave comments where you'd like or contact me directly.

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Recent Posts

Memento: An RFC and a Chrome Plugin

A belated congratulations to the Memento team on the publication of their RFC and Google Chrome plugin for the Memento WWW time travel protocol. A fan of the Internet Archive Wayback Machine? Ever look at the history of a Wikipedia page? Curious to know about changes to a particular web page? The first is now easier to access…the second is a work in progress…and the third may come to a website near you. See what I mean through this demonstration video.

Mystery in the Library

A colleague e-mailed me the other day expressing appreciation for the DLTJ blog in part, and also describing a mystery that she is running in her library:

Blah

Adrian (MN) Police Chief Shawn Langseth gathering evidence in the library “crime”.

Because I am staring out the window, at yet another snow-storm-in-the-works, having just learned that school is called off AGAIN (waiting for the library urchins to pour in), I am trying to get caught up on life outside of a small prairie town.

To combat some serious winter blues (and who doesn’t have them this year?), we have decided to have a just-for-fun “crime spree” at our library. Thus far, the local Chief of Police has no leads (he has graciously agreed to participate and has been kept in the dark as to the identities of the perpetrators). We decided that having a crime spree might be a more interesting way to get people to talk about the library.

Join the Community: Open Source is Nothing Without You

During the American Library Association meeting in Chicago in 2013 I gave an “ignite” talk on open source software in libraries. (The “ignite talk” format, if you’re not familiar, is one in which “each speaker is allocated five minutes of presentation time and is accompanied by 20 presentation slides. During presentations, each slide is displayed for 15 seconds and then automatically advanced.”1 ) The talk was geared to inspiring community involvement and commitment in open source projects. The abstract:

The open source method for developing software works best when everyone contributes a little bit to the process. Do you benefit from open source? Do you wish the open source you use was a little better? Don’t know why the community nature of open source is important? Hear what you can do to make the world a better place by nudging your favorite open source project along a path to perfection.

Implemented Open Source in your Library? Get Paid to Write a Case Study

Share your story of implementing an open source system at your library. If selected, you will get paid to develop a case study of your open source system adoption experience and learning.

LYRASIS, in partnership with the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is seeking academic and public libraries to share their experiences with open source systems, such as content repositories or institutional repositories, integrated library systems, or public-facing websites. The two selected case studies will be available on FOSS4Lib.org. This effort, part of the larger LYRASIS Digital initiative, is a continuation of LYRASIS working with libraries and other cultural heritage organizations to learn about, evaluate, adopt, and use open source software systems.