Integration announced for DPubS (e-journal publishing system) and FEDORA (digital object repository)

The August 2006 edition of “The DPubS Report” produced by Cornell University Libraries for the DPubS community announced work underway at the Penn State to bridge the worlds of DPubS and FEDORA. Here is the line from the newsletter:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT UPDATE--------------------------------------------------------------------------[...]NEAR-TERM SCHEDULED WORK[...]* Penn State is working on Fedora interoperability. The plan is tohave that capability in the September release, with a working versionfor testing in late August.

The newsletter goes on to say that the work will be made available under an open source license, so I for one can’t wait to see what it looks like and how we might apply it to our own needs.

Fedora plus Sakai: A view from 30,000 feet

Please note: the living, editable version of this document is now on Sakai’s Confluence in the “Resources” project area.

Edited by Peter Murray, OhioLINK. This document represents a summary of comments on the Sakai Developers mailing list on April 26-28, 2006 to a question posted by this document’s editor regarding possible integration points between Fedora and Sakai. The resulting threads were:

“Archiving and Preserving the Web” from the Internet Archive perspective

In case you were wondering what some of the back-channel discussion on the #code4lib IRC channel was on Tuesday, Ed Summers and I were watching an EDUCAUSE webcast on the Internet Archive‘s Archive-It project. Archive-It is a subscription service that allows institutions to crawl and search their own web archive through a web application. On Tuesday, the EDUCAUSE Live! webcast included the project manager and Senior Crawl Engineer (what a title!) from the Internet Archive to talk about not only the server, but the open source web crawler and ARC access tools (copied from the project home page):

Fedora plus Sakai — not quite that easy

In previous post I described to how easy it would be for Fedora to be integrated into Sakai and offered as reference the Entity.java interface as evidence. Well, it isn’t quite that easy. Two big clues:

  1. It is in the “legacy” part of the source code tree; and
  2. The interface has only getters (no setters).

Pretty damning evidence.

I still haven’t figured it all out yet, but there is this commentary in a document from last month with the title “The Sakai Framework: Proposal for Reorganization“:

Entity Bus

Fedora plus Sakai — a marriage made in heaven?

Note — there was a follow-up to this post.

What happens when you mix two Mellon-funded projects? Perhaps a nice bit of what they call synergy. The thinking goes something like this…

Sakai

“The Sakai Project is a community source software development effort to design, build and deploy a new Collaboration and Learning Environment (CLE) for higher education. … The Sakai Project’s primary goal is to deliver the Sakai application framework and associated CMS tools and components that are designed to work together. These components are for course management, and, as an augmentation of the original CMS model, they also support research collaboration. The software is being designed to be competitive with the best CMSs available.”1

Why Fedora? Because You Don’t Need Fedora

I’m often asked “Why is OhioLINK using FEDORA?”  (Just to eliminate any confusion at the start, I’m referring to the FEDORA Digital Object Repository, a project of Cornell’s computer science department and the University of Virginia Libraries, and not the Linux operating system distribution by Redhat.)  There are many reasons, but I was reminded of one recently while reading through the migration documentation for the 2.1.1 release that came out today.

In case of corruption or failure of the repository, the Fedora Rebuild utility can completely rebuild the repository by crawling the digital object XML source files that are stored on disk.

Resources for Describing Visual Materials

A recent thread on describing visual materials from the IMAGELIB mailing list sparked the descovery of these resources.

First was this bibliography of thesauri-related materials by Leonard Will of Willpower Information, an information management consultant in the U.K. It looks like a really good synopsis, and will be useful when adding controlled vocabularies to the DRC through MetaBuddy and other tools.

AJAX-based Video Editing Tool

This is amazing stuff — an AJAX-based video editing tool…in your web browser! I haven’t looked at the underlying technology or it’s licensing terms (the message announcing it says that it is tied to the ‘eyespot’ service) but it may be possible to port this to a generic repository. If so, this poses some exiting possibilities for the DRC!

Editing video in your browser? Try eyespot – the AJAX video editor

April 5th, 2006

Berkeley’s “bSpace Images” project

Word of this Fedora-based image collection tool comes from the Sakai Library & Repositiories discussion group [Sakai Collab account required].

Project Name & Description (Short)

bSpace Images Version 1.0
The initial version of bSpace Images will focus on personal collections and provide “baseline” functionality found in existing tools like Course Gallery, ARTstor, Luna Insight, Portfolio, and Spiro. Through a user centered design process, bSpace Images features will be driven by faculty observations and interviews. Unlike the other campus offerings, its interface design will be based on the faculty’s real needs.