XTF and FEDORA — Comments from the Community

Some questions and observations that have come in through mechanisms other than blog comments on the analysis of the XTF/FEDORA integration. I’ve reproduced those here for the sake of completeness, but also be sure to go back to the first two entries in this series to read the comments there as well.

Indiana University’s Observations


As it turns out, Indiana University is considering much the same path. They have an existing FEDORA-based repository and a number of XTF projects that have been in development for a while. They, too, are looking to put these two technologies together and have a page on their project website with Digital Repository Architecture > Search”>IU’s observations of an XTF plus FEDORA (plus more!) combination.

Analysis of CDL’s XTF textIndexer to Replace the Local Files with FEDORA Objects

This is a continuation of the investigation about integrating the California Digital Library’s XTF software into the FEDORA digital object repository that started earlier. This analysis looks at the textIndexer module in particular, starting with an overview of how textIndexer works now with filesystem-based objects and ending with an outline of how this could with reading objects from a FEDORA repository instead.

XTF’s Native File System handler

Natively, XTF wants to read content out of the file system. The core of the processing is done in these two class files:

TextIndexer.java

CDL’s XTF as a Front End to Fedora

We’re experimenting pretty heavily now with the California Digital Library‘s XTF framework as a front-end to a FEDORA object repository. Initial efforts look promising — thanks go out to Brian Tingle and Kirk Hastings of CDL; Jeff Cousens, Steve DiDomenico, and Bill Parod from Northwestern; and Ross Wayland from UVa for helping us along in the right direction.

XTF into Eclipse How-To


As we get more serious about XTF, I wrote up a How-To document for bringing XTF into Eclipse so that it can be deployed as a dynamic web application. Let me know if you find it useful. Definitely let me know if you find it in error. We haven’t put a version of XTF into OhioLINK’s source code repository, but that might follow shortly.

Fedora Advanced Applications Panel at JCDL2006

I am excited almost beyond description to be sharing a panel with Sandy Payette (Cornell
University, USA), Andrew Treloar (Monash University, Australia), Matthias Razum (Fiz
Karlsruhe, Germany), and Carl Lagoze (Cornell University, USA) at the upcoming Joint Conference on Digital Libraries. The tutorial is on Sunday afternoon (Sunday, June 11, 2006, 1:30-5:00pm local time) with the title “The Fedora Service Framework – Advanced Applications and Panel Discussion”. Sandy’s recent announcement include this abstract:

Thanks to Summer of Code applicants

Although we were a little concerned right about this time last week, you came through with a wonderful suite of applications with OhioLINK as the mentoring organization for the Google Summer of Code. In the end, we are blown away not only by the increase in quantity over last year, but also the quality as well. We received seven for the video snapshot idea, five for the grid-based bulk video conversion tool, one each for the JPIP-based disseminator and applet client, plus a half-dozen proposals for things we didn’t have on our list.

Fedora Disseminators to Enable Accessible Repository Content

Calling all accessibility technology experts! What follows is a line of thinking about using characteristics of the FEDORA digital object repository to enable access to content through non-graphical interfaces. Thanks to Linda Newman from the University of Cincinnati and others on the Friday morning DRC Developers conference call for triggering this line of thinking.

In a recent post defining universal disseminators for every object in our repository (if the last dozen words didn’t make sense, please read the linked article and come back), I hinted at having an auditory derivative of each object, at least at the preview level. During today’s conference call, Linda asked if such a disseminator could be used to offer different access points for non-GUI users. Well, why not? Let’s look back at the “presentation” part of the disseminator label:

Processing Raw Fedora Objects

Michael J. Giarlo wrote a very nice summary of my FEDORA trilogy (only three parts so far — I think there are more good things to say about FEDORA; and besides, I like Douglas Adams’ concept of what a trilogy should be), and added a piece that I hadn’t considered:

  1. Having one’s objects stored as XML on the filesystem also opens up opportunities to see how tools which act thereupon might be glued into the repository infrastructure. One such example might be for an XML-aware search engine (such as amberfish, Lucene, or Zebra). Since you’ve got low-level access to these files, it would be fairly simple to tack on a search & indexing system that is independent of your choice of repository.