DLTJ now Running on WordPress 2.3

Last night DLTJ was upgraded to WordPress 2.3. As far as I can tell, everything is working okay, but please let me know in the comments or the comment form if something doesn’t seem right. There were two tricky parts to the upgrade. (Well, three really, if you count the tasks necessary to extract the reminants of the Ultimate Tag Warrior (UTW) from the theme.) Fortunately, one of them was not the upgrade itself; after abandoning the Gentoo portage ebuild for WordPress, I switched to the Subversion update method. This was the first time I did an ‘svn switch‘ to get the new version, and it worked great.

Call for Participation in Meredith Wolfwater’s Biblioblogosphere Survey

Meredith Farkas is conducting a survey of those in the library and information science profession who blog:

After two years [since completing the first Survey of the Biblioblogosphere], it doesn’t take a survey to see that the library blogosphere has changed a great deal. So many people now are blogging who would never have considered it two years ago. While I felt like I knew of most of the library blogs out there in 2005, I know that I probably barely know 1/10 of them today. Something that was once seen as incredibly risky to do (and still is depending on how you approach it) is now thought of as a way to make a name for yourself in the profession. The number of libraries that are blogging has exploded as well. All of these changes have made me very curious about what we’d find today if we did the Survey of the Biblioblogosphere.

DLTJ Now Uses reCAPTCHA

DLTJ now uses reCAPTCHA on comment forms. reCAPTCHA is an enhanced version of CAPTCHA (an acronym for “completely automated public Turing test to tell computers and humans apart”) and like the original it is a type of challenge-response test used to determine whether there is a human user at the other end of the browser or if it is a software agent (such as a SPAM robot). And like the original it asks the user to type in recognized words from an image or a set of numbers from an audio clip.

reCAPTCHA example with textreCAPTCHA audio example

How US Airways Became My Airline-of-Last-Resort (And Why You Should Never Fly With Them, Too)

I will never fly U.S. Airways again, if I have a choice. A competing airline’s ticket is going to have to be substantially more expensive for me to even consider U.S. Airways as an alternative.

Where Do I Fit? Pew Thinks I’m a “Connector”

So here is my role on the internet — a Connector: “Connectors combine a sense that information technology is good for social purposes with a clear recognition that online resources are a great way to learn new things.” That definition comes from the Typology of Information and Communication Technology Users by the Pew Internet & American Life Project. How close did the definition come to my view of myself? Here is the “connector” definition picked apart sentence by sentence.

The Connectors’ collection of information technology is used for a mix of one-to-one and one-to-many communication.

What Do DLTJ and BlogHer Have In Common? Only Google Knows

Web Pages Related to DLTJ.ORG
With idle curiosity, I was poking around with what Google knows about DLTJ. Perhaps the most interesting piece was the company Google thinks I keep (found via a related:dltj.org search). Now most of the links are quite appropriate (the Library and Information Technology Association and ALA TechSource for instance) and some I’m quite pleased to be associated with (Richard Akerman’s Science Library Pad blog and Walt Crawford’s Walt at Random blog).

The one that has me most confused, however, is the link to BlogHer (“Where the women bloggers are”). Now, I’m not saying that the link is entirely inappropriate — the library profession is one dominated by females — or that I’m not pleased to be associated with female bloggers…

Can You Hear Me Now? DLTJ as a Podcast

Update 19-Jan-2011: I’ve decommissioned this service. Talkr seems to be unavailable, and I haven’t had time to find a replacement.

If reading the thoughts of the Jester via this blog wasn’t enough, you can now hear this witty (witless?) insights read to you through your favorite podcast player. I’ve been messing with some technology this weekend for a mashup of my own.

First, start with the Talkr service, which will take the text of your RSS feed posts and convert them to an audio file of a computer generated voice speaking the text to you. The audio file is included as an attachment in a new RSS feed of your post content. In the sidebar of DLTJ, you can subscribe to audio version of this blog using the “Subscribe to Postcast” graphic.Subscribe to Podcast graphic

Resource for Improving Higher Education Instruction

A few months back I referred to a project that used video to present information about accessibility needs in the classroom. That article was about how difficult it is to create markup for embedded video that is universally accessible and valid HTML. Late last month the larger project that used that work was released. Called the Faculty & Administrator Modules in Higher Education, or FAME, it is a professional development tool for use in higher education with information on how college faculty, administrators, disability service providers, and students can work individually and collaboratively to improve the accommodations, teaching-learning process, and overall campus environment for students with disabilities. The content on the website is broken up into five modules: