Changes to “Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church” Wikipedia Page, Visualized

Edited after initial publication to add: My thoughts are with the people in and around Charleston, South Carolina, this evening. What is making it out of the media fog to me tonight is your compassion for each other. Please be well as you absorb, internalize, and recover from this shocking display of inhumanity. 

This afternoon, Ed Summers tweeted:

From NISO: Invitation to NISO Patron Privacy Virtual Meetings

This article has been translated into Polish.

Over the next couple months, NISO is managing a project to “develop a Consensus Framework to Support Patron Privacy in Digital Library and Information Systems.”1 I’m honored and excited to be on the panel exploring this topic and creating the recommendations as this is a topic I’ve written about extensively on this blog. In May and June, NISO is conducting virtual meetings on four topics that will lead up to a day and a half in-person discussion at the ALA annual meeting at the end of June in San Francisco. Reproduced below is the invitation for people to listen in on the virtual meeting discussions. I hope (and expect) that there will be a twitter hashtag for those participating in the call (whether on the panel or in the audience) to add their thoughts. The #nisoprivacy hashtag will be used to gather the discussion online.

In Memory of Miss Rebecca Alison Meyer #663399Becca

On Saturday, at six years, eleven and a half hours old, Rebecca Meyer — a spark of joy to her parents, siblings, friends, and people she never met — died as a tumor in her brain snuffed out her spark. I learned from Jeffrey Zeldman of Matt Robin’s idea to honor her memory:

Rebecca’s favorite color was purple, and in the language of the web “#663399” is the color code for a particularly lovely shade of purple.

Code4Lib Journal Issue #20 Published; My Editorial: “It is Volunteers All the Way Down…”

Issue #20 of the Code4Lib Journal was just published, and I had the honor of being the coordinating editor for the issue. Being on the editorial committee of the Journal has been a heck of an experience, and I think I’ve had just a taste of what journal editors and publishers must go through to produce quality content.

My editorial focused on an issue that has banged around in my head for a while and has come up in multiple venues in recent years — how do we grow as a community while remaining responsive to the community and true to its roots. I suggest that there is a merit-based way to approach this, and I lay out my thoughts in that article.

What You’ll Find in My Twitter Stream

Earlier this month I found myself apologizing for some errant tweets that ended up in my Twitter stream1, and realizing that I had fallen into a pattern of sorts thought it would be useful to document. (This post, too, will be a good one to use as the ‘website’ link on my Twitter profile.) So here it goes. If you are following me on Twitter, these are the things you’ll see, in order of probability — from most likely to least likely.

Kids Birthday Parties in Libraries?

Do public libraries host birthday parties for children as part of their programming? I was with my son at a party for one of his friends a local bouncy inflatables place and happened to be thinking about library stuff while waiting for him to finish bouncing around. Suddenly (for me, at least) the two topics came together. A quick Google search for “library birthday parties” shows one promising hit at the Cambridge Springs Public Library but the rest seemed to be birthday parties for libraries or librarian-themed birthday parties. My son gave a noncommittal shrug when I asked him if he wanted his next party at the local library branch — that may be why they are not so common, but I wondered if anyone else had heard of libraries doing this.

Unglue.It — a service to crowdsource book licensing fees — launches

You could say “this is a service to watch” but that would be missing the point. Yesterday the ‘Unglue.It‘ service launched as a way to crowdsource the funding of a fee to authors to release their own works under a Creative Commons license.


Unglue.It's launch announcement

Setting Aside Time for Writing

It is time for New Year’s Resolutions, and the new habit I aim to pick up is setting aside some serious, concentrated chunks of time for writing each day. In taking a high-level review of goals and tasks at the end of the year, I found that I was tending to put off writing actions and had a significant number of them that had piled up. So I’ve decided to set aside the first 60 to 90 minutes of the work day focusing exclusively on writing. I know my mind is freshest at that early morning time, so I think it would be possible to knock out some good work then. Here are my thoughts on the process thus far.

What Happens When History Fights Back — A Review of “11/22/63: A Novel” by Stephen King

11/22/63 11/22/63Stephen King; Scribner 2011WorldCatLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder 
Pluck a string and it vibrates. As it vibrates there are points along the string where it is absolutely still. Pluck a companion string and sometimes those points line up. If you pull that string tighter there are more points of stillness and a greater chance that points will line up. If you pull it too tight, it snaps.

Campaign Contributions and Judiciary Committee Votes on SOPA (and a Plug for Rootstrikers)

I’ve been keeping an eye on the House Judiciary Committee markup session for the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) that have happened over the past two days along with the tweets that have been going out in reaction to the proceedings. One of the running threads in the commentary has been the theory of a correlation between campaign contributions from media creators and a desire by representatives to push SOPA through the committee. (Disclosure: I’ve come out publicly against SOPA.) By tabulating the roll call votes and using data from OpenSecrets.org, there does appear to be a correlation, and one that gets tighter the higher the percentage of contributions from media creators. I’ll show my work below.