2nd Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences — Accepted Papers and Travel Support

The conference organizers for WSSSPE2 have posted the list of accepted papers and the application for travel support. I was on the program committee for this year’s conference, and I can point to some papers that I think are particularly useful to libraries and the cultural heritage community in general:

Call for Papers: 2nd Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE2)

This is related to the Supporting Cultural Heritage Open Source Software (SCHOSS) Symposium last month. More on that topic in June. I am serving on the program committee for the WSSSPE2 conference.

Progress in scientific research is dependent on the quality and accessibility of software at all levels and it is critical to address challenges related to the development, deployment, and maintenance of reusable software as well as education around software practices. These challenges can be technological, policy based, organizational, and educational, and are of interest to developers (the software community), users (science disciplines), and researchers studying the conduct of science (science of team science, science of organizations, science of science and innovation policy, and social science communities).

Collector of Code4Lib Conference Tweets Now Turned On

As I did last year, I’ve set up Martin Hawksey’s Twitter Archiving Google Spreadsheet (TAGS) to cover this year’s Code4Lib conference twitter hashtag. This is a really neat tool that comes with its own dashboard, links to various visualizations, and access to the complete archive so you can make up your own derivatives.

Join the Community: Open Source is Nothing Without You

During the American Library Association meeting in Chicago in 2013 I gave an “ignite” talk on open source software in libraries. (The “ignite talk” format, if you’re not familiar, is one in which “each speaker is allocated five minutes of presentation time and is accompanied by 20 presentation slides. During presentations, each slide is displayed for 15 seconds and then automatically advanced.”1 ) The talk was geared to inspiring community involvement and commitment in open source projects. The abstract:

The open source method for developing software works best when everyone contributes a little bit to the process. Do you benefit from open source? Do you wish the open source you use was a little better? Don’t know why the community nature of open source is important? Hear what you can do to make the world a better place by nudging your favorite open source project along a path to perfection.

Archive and Visualization of LITA Forum Tweets

Using Google Spreadsheets, the Twitter API, and the TAGS document template from Martin Hawksey, I’ve set up an archive of tweets with the hashtag #LITAForum.

Martin has also created a couple of visualizations of tweets based on the archive:

The archive is updated automatically every 5 to 10 minutes.

Local and Unique and Digital: A Evolving Trend for Libraries and Cultural Heritage Institutions

These are slides and audio from presentation given at the LOUIS Users Group meeting, on October 4, 2013, in Baton Rouge, LA. The description of the talk was:

Libraries have been digitizing materials for decades as surrogates for access to physical materials, and in doing so have broadened the range of people and uses for library materials. With projects like Hathi Trust and Google Book Search systematically digitizing mass-produced monographs and making them available within the bounds of copyright law, libraries continue the trend of digitizing what is local and unique, and the emergence of projects like the Digital Public Library of America and OCLC’s WorldCat Digital Collection Gateway expand discoverability of the local and unique well beyond the library’s traditional reach. This presentation provides an overview of this trend, updates on what libraries can do, and describes activities LYRASIS is doing to help libraries and other cultural heritage institutions expand their reach.

Interoperability and Its Role In Standardization, Plus A ResourceSync Overview: Slidecast from ALA2013

At the American Library Association meeting in Chicago last month I gave a 20 minute presentation that was a combination of an overview of interoperability and standards plus a brief overview of the ResourceSync activity for the NISO Update session. Included below are my slides with a synchronized audio track.

Host Your Own Virtual Lightning Talks Using Google Hangout — Slides and Links from ALA2013 Presentation

In the “very meta” category, this morning I gave a lightning talk about lightning talks to a crowd of about 150 at the LITA Lightning Talks session. More specifically, it was a brief presentation on how Code4Lib uses Google Hangouts-on-Air for its Virtual Lightning Talks. The slides and links from the slides are included below.

URLs from the presentation


As promised, here are the URLs from the presentation.

Notes on the Code4Lib Virtual Lightning Talks

Last week I emcee’d the second Code4Lib Virtual Lightning talk session and I wanted to record some notes and pointers here in case me (or anyone else) wants to do the same thing again. First, though, here is a list of those that presented with links to the talks archived on Internet Archive.

Name Topic
Terry Brady File Analyzer and Metadata Harvester
Misty De Meo Transitioning a legacy thesaurus to SKOS/RDF
Roy Tennant Under the Hood of Hadoop Processing at OCLC Research
Kate Kosturski How I Taught Myself Drupal In a Weekend (And You Can Too!)

Trip Report of DPLA Audience & Participation Workstream

On December 6, 2012, the Audience and Participation workstream met at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. About two dozen colleagues participated in person and remotely via Google+ Hangout to talk about processes and strategies for getting content into the DPLA (the content hubs and service hubs strategy), brainstormed on the types of users and the types of uses for the DPLA, and outlined marketing and branding messages that aligned with the goals and technology of the DPLA while getting content contributors and application developers excited about what the DPLA represents. I’m happy to have been invited to take part in the meeting, am grateful to DPLA for funding my travel to attend in person, and came away excited and energized about the DPLA plans — if also with a few commitments to help move the project along.