Memento: An RFC and a Chrome Plugin

A belated congratulations to the Memento team on the publication of their RFC and Google Chrome plugin for the Memento WWW time travel protocol. A fan of the Internet Archive Wayback Machine? Ever look at the history of a Wikipedia page? Curious to know about changes to a particular web page? The first is now easier to access…the second is a work in progress…and the third may come to a website near you. See what I mean through this demonstration video.

WorldCat May Become Available as Library Linked Data under ODC-BY

On the second day of the OCLC Global Council meeting [agenda PDF] there was a presentation by Robin Murray (VP, OCLC Global Product Management) and Jim Michalko (VP, OCLC Research Library Partnership) called “Linked Open Data”. The title of the presentation was an understatement because the real heart of the matter was WorldCat data as linked open data. The presentation was about an hour long, and despite the technical difficulties was fascinating to listen to through the streaming video feed. OCLC says the archive of the meeting will be available at some point, and I urge you to check it out when it becomes available.

EBSCOhost Connection Records Found In-The-Wild

EBSCOhost Connect was announced in the spring of 2006 as near as I can recall. (I can’t find the press release about it on the EBSCO website. As close as I can come to a date is from an announcement at the Oregon School Library Information System.) After three years, I’ve finally seen an EBSCOhost Connect in Google web search results. This screencast and accompanying transcript (below) show what I’ve found.

Analysis of PubGet — An Expedited Fulltext Service for Life Science Journal Articles

In June, a new service that speeds access to life sciences literature reached a milestone. Called PubGet, it is a service that reduces the number of clicks to the full text of an article, and the milestone was activating the 50th institution using its service. Using its own proprietary “pathing engine”, it links directly to the full text on the publisher’s website. PubGet does this by understanding the link structure for each journal of each publisher and constructing the link to the full-text based on information from the citation. The PubGet service focuses on the life sciences journals indexed in PubMed — hence the play on names: PubMed to PubGet.

How It Works


OLINKS screen for Christensen article

Link Resolver screen for Christensen article

OAI-ORE Alpha Specifications Updated

As a result of discussions coming from the OAI-ORE open meeting in Baltimore in the first week of March, the document editors released a new version of the ORE alpha specifications (labeled “0.3″) earlier this month to coincide with the open meeting at Southampton, UK. In a message to the technical committee, Herbert Van de Sompel summarized the changes as:

  • Data Model: changes in the relationship between Resource Map and Aggregation; introduction of a solution regarding the reference in context; revised approach regarding nesting aggregations.
  • Atom serialization: Significant revision of the mapping from the ORE Model to Atom.

“Using Access Data for Paper Recommendations”

Here is a pair of papers that I’d like a chance to digest at some point. The first is “Recommending Related Papers Based on Digital Library Access Records” by Stefan Pohl, Filip Radlinski, and Thorsten Joachims. According to the notes on the paper, it is to appear in proceedings of JCDL’07. The abstract:

An important goal for digital libraries is to enable researchers to more easily explore related work. While citation data is often used as an indicator of relatedness, in this paper we demonstrate that digital access records (e.g. http-server logs) can be used as indicators as well. In particular, we show that measures based on co-access provide better coverage than co-citation, that they are available much sooner, and that they are more accurate for recent papers.

The Intersection of the Web Architecture with Scholarly Communication

Two previous posts on dltj.org have described the OAI Object Reuse and Exchange (ORE) project and the theory behind what has become known as the ‘Web Architecture’. These two areas meet up now in this post which describes the issues surrounding the raw Web Architecture as applied to a web of scholarly communication and a basic outline of what the ORE project hopes to accomplish.

Problems With the Web Architecture