JPEG2000 for Digital Preservation

Last month was an interesting month for discussion and news of JPEG2000 as an archival format. First, there was a series of posts on the IMAGELIB about the rational for using JPEG2000 for master files. It started with a posting by Tom Blake of Boston Public Library asking these questions:

What can I do with a JPEG200 that I can’t do with a TIFF, a good version
of Zoomify, and a well-designded DAMS?

Don’t you need to rely on a proprietary version/flavor of JPEG2000 and a
viewer to utilize its full potential?

GSoC: JPEG2000 JPIP Server and Viewer Applet

OhioLINK was excited and privileged to participate in the second annual Google Summer of Code — a program to inspire young developers and provide students in Computer Science and related fields the opportunity to do work related to their academic pursuits during the summer, and to support existing open source projects and organizations. This is the first of three posts summarizing the efforts of three students; this one details the work of Juan Pablo Garcia Ortiz, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Almeria in Spain, to build a JPEG2000 JPIP Streaming Server and Client Browser Viewer Applet. This is an edited version of his final report.

Minutes of the ALA/LITA JPEG2000 for Libraries and Archives interest group meeting

Attending: M. Anderson, U of Iowa; A. Laas, LexisNexis; Y. Han, U of Arizona; P. Howell, Western Michigan University; Y. Kaganovia, Princeton U; P. Murray, OhioLINK; K. Thompson, Smithsonian Libraries

Participants talked about their interest in JPEG2000 and their institution’s use of the standard: Western Michgan University is digitizing manuscripts and other special collections materials and using JPEG2000 for access; LexisNexis is using JPEG2000 in the maps portion of the U.S. Serials Set digitization program; the Smithsonian Libraries has started converting archival TIFFs to JPEG2000 and is considering use of the standard in the Biodiversity Heritage Library project (including a capability to cross-link taxonomic names in digitized text to oneline databases).

OhioLINK Mentors Three Students in the Google Summer of Code

OhioLINK is pleased to mentor three students working on projects for Ohio’s higher education and libraries around the world during the Google Summer of Code 2006. The three projects are:

JPIP Browser Applet and Streaming Server

Thanks to Summer of Code applicants

Although we were a little concerned right about this time last week, you came through with a wonderful suite of applications with OhioLINK as the mentoring organization for the Google Summer of Code. In the end, we are blown away not only by the increase in quantity over last year, but also the quality as well. We received seven for the video snapshot idea, five for the grid-based bulk video conversion tool, one each for the JPIP-based disseminator and applet client, plus a half-dozen proposals for things we didn’t have on our list.

OhioLINK’s Google Summer of Code ideas

Student applications for the Google Summer of Code program are being accepted starting on May 1st. In preparation for that date, OhioLINK has finished up its list of ideas and other supporting documentation. We welcome student applications seeking to further the development of information technology in academic libraries in Ohio and around the world. Questions about the program? Take a look at Google’s participant FAQ. Questions about the suggested projects or about OhioLINK? Contact Peter Murray.

OhioLINK-generated Ideas

This is the list of project ideas so far. Please take a look at the project ideas page on the DRC-Dev wiki for updates.