Wireless JPEG2000 Video and a Paper on How JPEG2000 Works

Two items of recent note in the JPEG2000 world. The first is the announcement of “the world’s first fully integrated wireless HDTV” that uses JPEG2000 over the air:

The High Definition LCD TV, featuring Pulse~LINK’s integrated CWave® UWB Wireless HDMI technology, will be on display for the first time at the 2008 International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 7-10. […] With the integration of CWave® Wireless HDMI, digital display products can be mounted anywhere in the room without needing to run data cabling from the TV to the content source, such as a DVR, Blu-ray or HD DVD player, or a live cable or satellite feed. Video data is encoded using the JPEG2000 video codec, the same codec used by movie theaters for “Digital Cinema,” providing a secure high quality HD experience. Pulse-LINK’s Wireless HDMI solution is engineered to be equivalent in both content protection and visual experience to a wired HDMI connection.

Interesting that the initial take-up of JPEG2000 in consumer electronics may come from the video arena rather that the still image photography arena. (This announcement comes via a private communication with Ron Murray at LC.)

The second item is a paper in the February 2008 issue of Notices of AMS where David Austin explains how JPEG and JPEG2000 compress image data. It is a short (just over three pages) look at the compression algorithms from a mathematical point of view. (This comes via a posting in Entertaining Research.)

Update 20080108T1213 : Add to this now a posting by Jeff Mather that describes the various compression schemes and file formats that share the JPEG moniker. Do you think there is only one, or possibly two, “JPEG” standards. Read Jeff’s posting for an overview of everything that is out there.

(This post was updated on 08-Jan-2008.)