Top Tech Trends, ALA Annual 2015 edition: Local and Unique; New metrics and citation tools

I threw my hat into the ring to be on the LITA Top Tech Trends panel at the ALA annual conference later this month in San Francisco, and never could I say that I was more excited not to be selected. (You can find more info on this year’s Top Tech Trends session in the ALA Conference Scheduler.) There is a great lineup of panelists this year:

  • Sarah Houghton (Moderator), Director of the San Rafael Public Library – @TheLiB
  • Carson Block, 20-year veteran of libraries and now a library technology consultant – @CarsonBlock

Thursday Threads: Advertising and Privacy, Giving Away Linux, A View of the Future

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In just a few weeks there will be a gathering of 25,000 librarians in the streets of San Francisco for the American Library Association annual meeting. The topics on my mind as the meeting draws closer? How patrons intersect with advertising and privacy when using our services. What one person can do to level the information access divide using free software. Where is technology in our society going to take us next. Heady topics for heady times.

Can Google’s New “My Account” Page be a Model for Libraries?

One of the things discussed in the NISO patron privacy conference calls has been the need for transparency with patrons about what information is being gathered about them and what is done with it. The recent announcement by Google of a "My Account" page and a privacy question/answer site got me thinking about what such a system might look like for libraries. Google and libraries are different in many ways, but one similarity we share is that people use both to find information. (This is not the only use of Google and libraries, but it is a primary use.) Might we be able to learn something about how Google puts users in control of their activity data? Even though our motivations and ethics are different, I think we can.

My View of the NISO Patron Privacy Working Group

"Privacy Please" by Josh HallettYesterday Bobbi Newman posted Thinking Out Loud About Patron Privacy and Libraries on her blog. Both of us are on the NISO committee to develop a Consensus Framework to Support Patron Privacy in Digital Library and Information Systems, and her article sounded a note of discouragement that I hope to dispel while also outlining what I’m hoping to see come out of the process. I think we share a common belief: the privacy of our patron’s activity data is paramount to the essence of being a library. I want to pull out a couple of sentences from her post:

Seeking new opportunity in library technology

Dear Colleagues,

Know of someone looking for a skilled library technologist? The funding for my position at LYRASIS will run out at the end of June, and I am looking for a new opportunity for my skills in library technology, open source, and community engagement. My resume/c.v. is online, and I welcome any information about potential positions.

Setting the Right Environment: Remote Staff, Service Provider Participants, and Big-Tent Open Source Communities

NOTE! I was asked recently to prepare a 15 minute presentation on lessons learned working with a remote team hosting open source applications. The text of that presentation is below with links added to more information. Photographs are from DPLA and Flickr, and are used under Public Domain or Creative Commons derivatives-okay licenses. Photographs link to their sources.

Thursday Threads: Man Photocopies Ebook, Google AutoAwesomes Photos, Librarians Called to HTTPS

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In this week’s threads: a protest — or maybe just an art project — by a reader who saves his e-book copy of Orwell’s 1984 by photocopying each page from his Kindle, the “AutoAwesome” nature of artificial intelligence, and a call to action for libraries to implement encryption on their websites.

Advancing Patron Privacy on Vendor Systems with a Shared Understanding

Last week I had the pleasure of presenting a short talk at the second virtual meeting of the NISO effort to reach a Consensus Framework to Support Patron Privacy in Digital Library and Information Systems. The slides from the presentation are below and on SlideShare, followed by a cleaned-up transcript of my remarks.

Institution-wide ORCID Adoption Test in U.K. Shows Promise

Via Gary Price’s announcement on InfoDocket comes word of a cost-benefit analysis for the wholesale adoption of ORCID identifiers by eight institutions in the U.K. The report, Institutional ORCID, Implementation and Cost Benefit Analysis Report [PDF], looks at the perspectives of stakeholders, a summary of findings from the pilot institutions, a preliminary cost-benefit analysis, and a 10-page checklist of consideration points for higher education institutions looking to adopt ORCID identifiers in their information systems. The most interesting bits of the executive summary came from the part discussing the findings from the pilot institutions.

Thursday Threads: Library RFP Registry, Transformed Libraries talk at IMLSfocus, DIY VPN

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Welcome spring in the northern hemisphere! Thoughts turn to fresh new growth — a new tool to help with writing documents for procuring library systems, a fresh way to think about how libraries can transform and be transformed, and spring cleaning for your browsing habits with a do-it-yourself VPN.