Thursday Threads: Twitter Timeline Changes, Report on Future Library Technology, USB Security

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Two weeks in a row! This week’s DLTJ Thursday Threads looks at how Twitter changed its timeline functionality to include things that it thinks you’ll find interesting. Next, for the academic libraries in the audience, is a report from the New Media Consortium on trends and technologies that will libraries will likely encounter in the next five years. Lastly, news about research into how USB devices can spread malware in ways we can’t detect.

Thursday Threads: Payment Card Security, Crap Detection, VoIP in your Hand

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Welcome to the revival of DLTJ Thursday Threads. With the summer over and the feeling of renewal towards this blog and its topics, I’m happy to be back sharing tidbits of technology that I hope you will find interesting. Today’s set of threads covers the gnarly security issues behind the bright-and-shiny chip-on-payment card systems being rolled out by banks and retailers in the U.S., a list of resources for checking things that you read about online, and a heads-up on changes to how your phone will work in the near future.

In Memory of Miss Rebecca Alison Meyer #663399Becca

On Saturday, at six years, eleven and a half hours old, Rebecca Meyer — a spark of joy to her parents, siblings, friends, and people she never met — died as a tumor in her brain snuffed out her spark. I learned from Jeffrey Zeldman of Matt Robin’s idea to honor her memory:

Rebecca’s favorite color was purple, and in the language of the web “#663399″ is the color code for a particularly lovely shade of purple.

Call for Papers: 2nd Workshop on Sustainable Software for Science: Practice and Experiences (WSSSPE2)

This is related to the Supporting Cultural Heritage Open Source Software (SCHOSS) Symposium last month. More on that topic in June. I am serving on the program committee for the WSSSPE2 conference.

Progress in scientific research is dependent on the quality and accessibility of software at all levels and it is critical to address challenges related to the development, deployment, and maintenance of reusable software as well as education around software practices. These challenges can be technological, policy based, organizational, and educational, and are of interest to developers (the software community), users (science disciplines), and researchers studying the conduct of science (science of team science, science of organizations, science of science and innovation policy, and social science communities).

Collector of Code4Lib Conference Tweets Now Turned On

As I did last year, I’ve set up Martin Hawksey’s Twitter Archiving Google Spreadsheet (TAGS) to cover this year’s Code4Lib conference twitter hashtag. This is a really neat tool that comes with its own dashboard, links to various visualizations, and access to the complete archive so you can make up your own derivatives.

Memento: An RFC and a Chrome Plugin

A belated congratulations to the Memento team on the publication of their RFC and Google Chrome plugin for the Memento WWW time travel protocol. A fan of the Internet Archive Wayback Machine? Ever look at the history of a Wikipedia page? Curious to know about changes to a particular web page? The first is now easier to access…the second is a work in progress…and the third may come to a website near you. See what I mean through this demonstration video.

Mystery in the Library

A colleague e-mailed me the other day expressing appreciation for the DLTJ blog in part, and also describing a mystery that she is running in her library:

Blah

Adrian (MN) Police Chief Shawn Langseth gathering evidence in the library “crime”.

Because I am staring out the window, at yet another snow-storm-in-the-works, having just learned that school is called off AGAIN (waiting for the library urchins to pour in), I am trying to get caught up on life outside of a small prairie town.

To combat some serious winter blues (and who doesn’t have them this year?), we have decided to have a just-for-fun “crime spree” at our library. Thus far, the local Chief of Police has no leads (he has graciously agreed to participate and has been kept in the dark as to the identities of the perpetrators). We decided that having a crime spree might be a more interesting way to get people to talk about the library.

Join the Community: Open Source is Nothing Without You

During the American Library Association meeting in Chicago in 2013 I gave an “ignite” talk on open source software in libraries. (The “ignite talk” format, if you’re not familiar, is one in which “each speaker is allocated five minutes of presentation time and is accompanied by 20 presentation slides. During presentations, each slide is displayed for 15 seconds and then automatically advanced.”1 ) The talk was geared to inspiring community involvement and commitment in open source projects. The abstract:

The open source method for developing software works best when everyone contributes a little bit to the process. Do you benefit from open source? Do you wish the open source you use was a little better? Don’t know why the community nature of open source is important? Hear what you can do to make the world a better place by nudging your favorite open source project along a path to perfection.