Implemented Open Source in your Library? Get Paid to Write a Case Study

Share your story of implementing an open source system at your library. If selected, you will get paid to develop a case study of your open source system adoption experience and learning.

LYRASIS, in partnership with the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is seeking academic and public libraries to share their experiences with open source systems, such as content repositories or institutional repositories, integrated library systems, or public-facing websites. The two selected case studies will be available on FOSS4Lib.org. This effort, part of the larger LYRASIS Digital initiative, is a continuation of LYRASIS working with libraries and other cultural heritage organizations to learn about, evaluate, adopt, and use open source software systems.

Archive and Visualization of LITA Forum Tweets

Using Google Spreadsheets, the Twitter API, and the TAGS document template from Martin Hawksey, I’ve set up an archive of tweets with the hashtag #LITAForum.

Martin has also created a couple of visualizations of tweets based on the archive:

The archive is updated automatically every 5 to 10 minutes.

On questions regarding ISO/DIS 18626, Information and documentation — Interlibrary Loan Transactions

There is a ballot under consideration within the ISO TC 46/SC 4 on InterLibraryLoan Transactions. The ballot description is:

This International Standard specifies the transactions between libraries or libraries and other agencies to handle requests for library items and following exchange of messages. This standard is intended to at first supplement and eventually succeed the existing international ILL standards ISO 10160, ISO 10161-1 and ISO 10161-2, which are based on the outdated open systems interconnection model. The introduction of the draft standard provides some background on the relationship of the new standard to the previous one.

Thursday Threads: Password Managers, DRM coming to the Browser, Personal Data Brokers

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It is a security/privacy edition of DLTJ Thursday Threads this week. First a link to a 3-page PDF that talks about the use of password managers to keep all of your internet passwords unique and strong. Next a story about how the W3C standards body is looking at standardizing digital rights management for browser content. And finally, a story about a site that one personal data broker put up that gives you a glimpse of what they know about you.

Local and Unique and Digital: A Evolving Trend for Libraries and Cultural Heritage Institutions

These are slides and audio from presentation given at the LOUIS Users Group meeting, on October 4, 2013, in Baton Rouge, LA. The description of the talk was:

Libraries have been digitizing materials for decades as surrogates for access to physical materials, and in doing so have broadened the range of people and uses for library materials. With projects like Hathi Trust and Google Book Search systematically digitizing mass-produced monographs and making them available within the bounds of copyright law, libraries continue the trend of digitizing what is local and unique, and the emergence of projects like the Digital Public Library of America and OCLC’s WorldCat Digital Collection Gateway expand discoverability of the local and unique well beyond the library’s traditional reach. This presentation provides an overview of this trend, updates on what libraries can do, and describes activities LYRASIS is doing to help libraries and other cultural heritage institutions expand their reach.

Thursday Threads: Windows XP end-of-life, Maturing open source models, Trashcans that track you

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Three groups of stories in this long-in-coming DLTJ Thursday Threads. First, we look at the pent-up risks of running Windows XP systems given that support for that operating system is scheduled to end in April 2014. Second, a pair of articles that look at the ups and downs of open source software governance as it relates to the Apache Foundation. And lastly, look out for that garbage can — it may be watching your every move.

Make Plans to Attend the ResourceSync Post-Conference Tutorial at LITA Forum

ResourceSync LogoAs you are planning your trip to the 2013 LITA Forum in Louisville in mid-November, plan to stay a few hours longer to attend the ResourceSync Tutorial happening after the close of the main conference on Sunday. Herbert van de Sompel will lead this 3-hour session where attendees can learn about how the emerging ResourceSync standard can be used to synchronize web resources between servers. There is no cost to attend the post-conference tutorial, but we would appreciate knowing how many people are coming. Please select the post conference checkbox on the registration form to let us know.

Interoperability and Its Role In Standardization, Plus A ResourceSync Overview: Slidecast from ALA2013

At the American Library Association meeting in Chicago last month I gave a 20 minute presentation that was a combination of an overview of interoperability and standards plus a brief overview of the ResourceSync activity for the NISO Update session. Included below are my slides with a synchronized audio track.

Host Your Own Virtual Lightning Talks Using Google Hangout — Slides and Links from ALA2013 Presentation

In the “very meta” category, this morning I gave a lightning talk about lightning talks to a crowd of about 150 at the LITA Lightning Talks session. More specifically, it was a brief presentation on how Code4Lib uses Google Hangouts-on-Air for its Virtual Lightning Talks. The slides and links from the slides are included below.

URLs from the presentation


As promised, here are the URLs from the presentation.

LYRASIS’ “Reposervice” Setup Pushed to GitHub

Earlier this month published ‘reposervice’ to GitHub. Reposervice is a “self-contained” Islandora installation source tree that is intended to smooth the LYRASIS deployment of repository services between development servers, a staging server and production servers. It is a bit of a work-in-progress at the moment, but others might find it useful as well.

(By the way, if you had looked at Reposervice prior to June 18th, you may have noticed a missing critical element — the Drupal submodule. Not because you couldn’t add Drupal yourself but because the Reposervice clone has relative soft symlinks to the Islandora modules positioned in the top level Reposervice directory.)