Thursday Threads: Learn to Code in 2012, Issues with Apple’s iBooks Author, SOPA/PIPA Are Dead

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

The internet has survived the great SOPA blackout, and we’re still talking about the fallout. Apple made a major announcement of plans to support textbooks on iPads, but there are concerns about the implementation. But the first story this week is about a free service geared towards teaching people how to program with weekly lessons throughout 2012.

My ALA Midwinter 2012 Schedule

The snow is falling here in central Ohio, so I’m eager to leave here and head to warm Dallas for ALA Midwinter 2012. I’m looking forward to catching up with colleagues; making new acquaintances; learning the latest thinking on RDA, linked data, and standards activity; and talking about free/open source software in libraries. On the latter point, I encourage you to come see me give an introduction to the newly announced FOSS4LIB site, answer questions, and take feedback on Saturday morning (10:30 to 11:30) or Sunday morning (10:30 to 11:30). (Or, if you are not coming to Midwinter, sign up for one of the free webinar sessions later in January and February.)

Thursday Threads: SOPA, PROTECT-IP, Research Works Act, and Broad E-Textbook Pilot

Stop SOPA and Protect-IP

This blog will be present first-time users with a warning page on January 18, 2012 — the day that many internet sites are using to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) — and January 23rd, 2012 — the day before the U.S. Senate may vote on the PROTECT-IP act. DLTJ is proud to join many other sites in this demonstration of solidarity for an open, transparent internet.

Thought you heard that SOPA was dead? Or was modified to be acceptable? Or that PIPA is on the ropes? As of January 17th, these statements aren’t true:

Helping Libraries Consider Open Source Software

One of the key activities that brought me to LYRASIS many months ago is going to see the light of day in about 10 days at ALA Midwinter — a set of tools to help libraries determine if open source software is right for them and what open source software works the best. Here is the announcement snippet from today’s LYRASIS newsletter:

FREE Open Source Sessions at ALA Midwinter: Take Control of Your Library’s Software

Open Source LogoIs your library thinking about jumping into open source software, but not sure if you have the tools in place to succeed, or where to start?

Setting Aside Time for Writing

It is time for New Year’s Resolutions, and the new habit I aim to pick up is setting aside some serious, concentrated chunks of time for writing each day. In taking a high-level review of goals and tasks at the end of the year, I found that I was tending to put off writing actions and had a significant number of them that had piled up. So I’ve decided to set aside the first 60 to 90 minutes of the work day focusing exclusively on writing. I know my mind is freshest at that early morning time, so I think it would be possible to knock out some good work then. Here are my thoughts on the process thus far.

Thursday Threads: Legal Implications of SOPA/PROTECT-IP, Learning from Best Buy, Open Source in Medicine

Receive DLTJ Thursday Threads:

by E-mail

by RSS

Delivered by FeedBurner

Welcome to the new year! Threads this week include a brief analysis of the legal problems in store if SOPA and PROTECT-IP become law, what an analysis of the problems with Best Buy might teach libraries, and why open source licensing of clinical tools is important.