Trip Report of DPLA Audience & Participation Workstream

On December 6, 2012, the Audience and Participation workstream met at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. About two dozen colleagues participated in person and remotely via Google+ Hangout to talk about processes and strategies for getting content into the DPLA (the content hubs and service hubs strategy), brainstormed on the types of users and the types of uses for the DPLA, and outlined marketing and branding messages that aligned with the goals and technology of the DPLA while getting content contributors and application developers excited about what the DPLA represents. I’m happy to have been invited to take part in the meeting, am grateful to DPLA for funding my travel to attend in person, and came away excited and energized about the DPLA plans — if also with a few commitments to help move the project along.

Trip Report of DPLA Chattanooga Appfest: Project Shows Signs of Life

Below is my report of the DPLA AppFest last month. This post is the raw input of an article on the IMLS blog that was co-written with Mary Barnett, Social Media Coordinator at the Chattanooga Public Library. I also attended yesterday’s DPLA Audience and Participation workstream meeting at George Mason University, and hope to have a similar trip report posted soon.

The Digital Public Library of America held an AppFest gathering at the Chattanooga Public Library on November 8-9, 2012 for a full day of designing, developing and discussion. About 40 people attended from a wide range of backgrounds:

Model Language on Library Data Ownership

In September, Carl Grant wrote a blog post on the ownership of library data (“We have a problem… another vendor appearing to need education about exactly WHO owns library data“) that has been rolling around my own thoughts for, well, months. The spark of Carl’s post was a Twitter conversation where a major library system vendor appeared to be taking steps to limit what library/customers can do with their own data.

The Security Implications of Teaching Librarians to Program

Should librarians be learning to how to develop software? This theme has come up in the past few years1 and I think it is a good thing. I once had a boss that told his group “I want you guys to automate yourself out of your job because there are far more interesting things you could be working on.” I think that is an empowering philosophy for staff of any type.

What You’ll Find in My Twitter Stream

Earlier this month I found myself apologizing for some errant tweets that ended up in my Twitter stream1, and realizing that I had fallen into a pattern of sorts thought it would be useful to document. (This post, too, will be a good one to use as the ‘website’ link on my Twitter profile.) So here it goes. If you are following me on Twitter, these are the things you’ll see, in order of probability — from most likely to least likely.

Libraries as Provisioner, Quartermaster, and Curator

Yesterday I heard Catherine Murray-Rust give a keynote at the Georgia Knowledge Repository workshop. She used the phrase, and I think I transcribed this correctly, “provisioning of knowledge” when describing the activities that institutional repositories can do. That phrase reminded me about a recent discussion on a mailing list (I can’t find it now) where people were seeking short definitions of what it is that libraries do. I think I have a new one: in your knowledge journey, libraries are your provisioner, quartermaster, and curator of resources.

Provisioner

pro·vi·sion \prə-ˈvi-zhən\ : to supply with needed materials (as food)1

ALA Virtual Conference Includes Talk on Open Source in Libraries

ALA has its “Virtual Conference” coming up on July 18th and 19th. It is two days of at-your-desktop talks on some of the most interesting topics in libraries today. I’m presenting a derivative of the Introducing FOSS4Lib webinar and in-person. The version I’m doing for the ALA Virtual Conference has a broader look at open source software in libraries in addition to the tools and software registry on FOSS4Lib.org. There are a number of sessions on the state of ebooks in libraries plus talks on effective engagement with patrons and building responsive organizations. Registration for the virtual conference is $69 ($51.75 if you attended the ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim), and group registration for up to 15 IP addresses is $300 ($225 if you registered for the Annual Conference).

Kids Birthday Parties in Libraries?

Do public libraries host birthday parties for children as part of their programming? I was with my son at a party for one of his friends a local bouncy inflatables place and happened to be thinking about library stuff while waiting for him to finish bouncing around. Suddenly (for me, at least) the two topics came together. A quick Google search for “library birthday parties” shows one promising hit at the Cambridge Springs Public Library but the rest seemed to be birthday parties for libraries or librarian-themed birthday parties. My son gave a noncommittal shrug when I asked him if he wanted his next party at the local library branch — that may be why they are not so common, but I wondered if anyone else had heard of libraries doing this.

My ALA Anaheim 2012 Schedule

It is that time of year again where representatives from the library profession all gather for the annual Annual Library Association meeting. This year it is in Anaheim, California on June 21–26. And as the pace of technology continues to push libraries into new areas of content and service, this meeting promises to be an exciting one. Or, at least I’m planning on having a fun and engaging time. Here is my tentative schedule of public events. If you’d like to get together to chat outside these times, please get in touch.

Updated to correct the date for the LYRASIS lounge.

Unglue.It — a service to crowdsource book licensing fees — launches

You could say “this is a service to watch” but that would be missing the point. Yesterday the ‘Unglue.It‘ service launched as a way to crowdsource the funding of a fee to authors to release their own works under a Creative Commons license.


Unglue.It's launch announcement