Google Book Search Settlement and Library Consortia

The Google Book Search Settlement Agreement includes two points where library consortia come into play: discounts for institutional subscriptions and receipt of digitized books by members of a consortium. The Google Book Search Settlement calls such consortia “Institutional Consortia” and the definition of that phrase and the places in the Settlement where it occurs are extracted below.

This is a review of the Settlement document as it was submitted to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in the case of The Author’s Guild et al v. Google Inc. The court has given preliminary approval of the Settlement, but it might still change.

More About OhioLINK’s Discovery Layer Desires

On Friday, OhioLINK released an addendum to its inquiry for a comprehensive discovery layer that answers questions submitted from potential bidders. This is a distilled version of that addendum — posted here with the desire to reach others that may be interested in submitting a bid. Please note that this posting is not the official call for proposals nor the official addendum (it isn’t even the entire addendum). Nothing said here binding on the proposal process. If you are interested in making a proposal for a solution or part of the solution for what we are seeking, please contact Mary Pasquinelli, Sr. Purchasing Agent at Wright State University (OhioLINK’s administrative agent), and reference ITN 601908 (Room 301 University Hall, 3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy., Dayton, Ohio 45435, phone 937-775-2411, FAX 937-775-3711, email: mary.pasquinelli@wright.edu).

Preliminary Court Approval of Google Book Settlement; Final Approval Hearing Set

The Associate Press reported on Monday evening that the court has given preliminary approval to the settlement negotiated between Google and book authors and publishers over the use of copyrighted materials in the Google Book Search Library project. In giving preliminary approval, Judge John E. Sprizzo authorized the publication of the notice of settlement and set a final settlement fairness hearing for June 11, 2009.

Timeline


The judge’s decision sets in motion a series of events over the next eight months:

OLE Project Webcast, Workshops Scheduled

Coming out of the face-to-face meeting in Rutgers earlier this month, the OLE Project has posted a number of announcements for upcoming events. The first is a webcast on Nov. 20, 2008 from 3:00pm to 4:30pm Eastern Standard Time, US, free of charge and open to anyone. The webcast topics are:

  • Update on the project
  • Timeline and topics for remaining project activities
  • Overview of upcoming OLE workshops and invitation to attend
  • Overview of working groups and invitation to participate
  • Q&A

Registration is required; directions for accessing the webcast will be emailed to those who register. There is a limit of 200 participants (the maximum the webcast service allows), and the session will be recorded for later playback.

Google Book Search Settlement: Public Access Service

One of the very relevant aspects of the Google Book Search Settlement Agreement to libraries is the provision that allows for free public access to the full text of books in public and academic libraries. The Notice of Settlement summary says: “Google will provide, on request, ‘Public Access’ licenses for free through a dedicated computer terminal at each public library building and through an agreed number of dedicated computer terminals at non-profit higher educational institutions located in the United States.” (Notice; Q9(F)(1)(c); p. 18) The details beyond the summary are quite a bit more interesting and, of course, have tidbits of useful information that isn’t in the summary.