Survey on Library Professional Perceptions

Jenny Emanuel, Electronic Services Librarian at University of Central Missouri, posted an invitation to complete a survey on how library professionals think of themselves to several mailing lists. As part of the ALA Emerging Leaders 2007 program, she is part of a team look for options on rebranding the librarian profession in the digital world. This looks like it will have interesting results; if you consider yourself a “library professional” take the survey yourself: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.asp?u=371423757475.

Out of all of the questions, number 10 struck me as the heart of the matter:

10. How strongly do you agree with the following statements?

“Using Access Data for Paper Recommendations”

Here is a pair of papers that I’d like a chance to digest at some point. The first is “Recommending Related Papers Based on Digital Library Access Records” by Stefan Pohl, Filip Radlinski, and Thorsten Joachims. According to the notes on the paper, it is to appear in proceedings of JCDL’07. The abstract:

An important goal for digital libraries is to enable researchers to more easily explore related work. While citation data is often used as an indicator of relatedness, in this paper we demonstrate that digital access records (e.g. http-server logs) can be used as indicators as well. In particular, we show that measures based on co-access provide better coverage than co-citation, that they are available much sooner, and that they are more accurate for recent papers.

Disseminators As the Core of an Object Repository

I’ve been working to get JBoss Seam tied into Fedora, and along the way thought it would be wise to stop and document a core concept of this integration: the centrality of Fedora Disseminators in the the design of the Ohio Digital Resource Commons. Although there is nothing specific to JBoss Seam (a Java Enterprise Edition application framework) in these concepts, making an object “render itself” does make the Seam-based interface application easier to code and understand. A disseminator-centric architecture also allows us to put our code investment where it matters the most — in the repository framework — and exploit that investment in many places. So what does it mean to have a disseminator-centric architecture and have objects “render themselves”?

Following Up on Adobe Photoshop and JPEG2000

The discussion has died down on Jack Nack’s blog posting about the future of JPEG2000 support in Photoshop. Since I last updated my own commentary on the issue, there have been a few more comments, including one by Erich Kesse from the University of Florida. Jack has added a few follow-ups to comments left on his blog, including this one at the bottom of Erich’s comment:

[Thanks for the detailed feedback. I would note that regardless of what Adobe does with JPEG 2000, other developers can create JPEG 2000 reading/writing plug-ins for the app. --J.]

What Do DLTJ and BlogHer Have In Common? Only Google Knows

Web Pages Related to DLTJ.ORG
With idle curiosity, I was poking around with what Google knows about DLTJ. Perhaps the most interesting piece was the company Google thinks I keep (found via a related:dltj.org search). Now most of the links are quite appropriate (the Library and Information Technology Association and ALA TechSource for instance) and some I’m quite pleased to be associated with (Richard Akerman’s Science Library Pad blog and Walt Crawford’s Walt at Random blog).

The one that has me most confused, however, is the link to BlogHer (“Where the women bloggers are”). Now, I’m not saying that the link is entirely inappropriate — the library profession is one dominated by females — or that I’m not pleased to be associated with female bloggers…

2007 Web Design Survey

2007 Web Design Survey logoFriend and former colleague Eric Meyer writes about the 2007 Web Design Survey (first annual) on his blog. It is an effort to “increase knowledge of web design and boost respect for the profession” and asks questions to learn “Who are we? Where do we live? What are our titles, our skills, our educational backgrounds? Where and with whom do we work? What do we earn? What do we value?”

JPEG2000 Activity in the Google Summer of Code

OhioLINK is not participating in the Google Summer of Code this year (too many other things going on for our staff to be effective mentors), which is why it is refreshing to see work on the wider adoption of JPEG2000 — one of our core goals — continue on other fronts. Among this year’s 900 projects accepted by mentors are two that involve J2K. All of this is welcome news, coming in the same month that Adobe is questioning the need for JPEG2000 support in Photoshop. My public gratitude goes out to Google for their third year of offering financial and logistical support to their Summer of Code program.

Questioning the Future of JPEG2000 Support in Photoshop

John Nack, Senior Product Manager for Adobe Photoshop, posted a query recently to his blog seeking customer reactions to the possibility of removing JPEG2000 support from Photoshop:

Adobe developed the plug-in in anticipation of cameras entering the market with native JPEG 2000 support on board. The thing is, that hasn’t happened, nor have we seen other widespread adoption of the format in places we know Photoshop is being used. [...] As we plan for the future, we need to retire features that no longer make sense & focus instead on capabilities that matter. So, do you use JPEG 2000? If so, please give a shout and let us know how & why you use it.